Author Topic: Portillo, Chile  (Read 1326 times)

stwildcat

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Portillo, Chile
« on: May 14, 2006, 08:04:50 am »
I'm going to Portillo, Chile in August and I'm trying to decide on what ski I should purchase for the trip. Has anyone ever been there? what kind of conditions can I expect? What ski would be a good choice for the conditions out there? (I am assuming its going to be a lot of powde)

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jbotti

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2006, 12:29:03 pm »
Stwildcat,
I have been to Chile to ski. I have not been to Portillio but the conditions at Valle Nevado are similar. The storms in Chile tend to be big, they can last for sevaral days and they usually come with 70-100 mph winds. As well, most of the skiiing in Chile is above the tree line which makes skiing in white out conditions quite difficult. Resorts often close lifts in the strong winds. After the storm, you can get some amazing powder days, and in general the number of skiers at the resorts is quite modest vs. what we are used to in the US. You can ski fresh lines for as long as a week after a big storm.

The real problem with Chile is what I mentioned before. They don't get a lot of storms. The snow comes in big bunches, and it can be weeks in between storms. Having said this, you definitely want a ski that you enjoy on hard groomed conditions, because if it doesn't snow, this is what you will be skiing on. An all mountain ski that does well on groomed terrain and that will float in some pow (Head IM 82's) would be a good choice. The other option would be to call Portillo, and find out if they have powder skis to rent. If so, I would bring carving skis and if you get lucky and have some powder days, then you can rent fat powder skis.

I would mentally plan for hard snow conditions (becaiuse this is what they have for a good percentage of the season). If this is what you end op getting you won't be disappointed. If you do get some fresh snow you will be even more excited. Think of it as similar to carrying an umbrella on a day that it might rain. When it doesn't rain you are pumped, but you are prepared no matter what.

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2006, 03:23:05 pm »
HAHAHA....good analogy....I currently have a pair of iM72's (which I might swap out for a pair of Legend 8000's). I am having a very difficult time deciding between the two. I live in Miami so obviously I do not get to many chances to demo my skis or even see them in person being that we do not have a lot of ski shops out here. I was wondering if you have had any experience on either one of these skis? If so, how do they compare to the iM82's that you mentioned assuming you have skied on the iM82's?

Thanks
Steve

jbotti

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 02:33:40 pm »
I have skied on neither. I own a pair of the Head IM 88's (and sevral other Head skis) and I have read reviews and talked with people who have skied the IM 72's and the IM 82's.

I can say with conviction that If I was headed to Chile (and I owned IM 72's) I would bring the IM 72's with me as long as I could rent powder skis if a big storm was to hit. With hard snow conditions in Chile, the IM 72's will be a pretty good ski IMO. JB.

Gary

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2006, 08:23:40 am »
I'm jealous....skiing in August.....my birthday month...one of these days....one of the days I'm doing it!

Anyways, if the snow is firm and hardpack....take along your carving or all mountain skis. For me it would be my RX8's. Since I also own a pair of Head IM77 chips, I might bring those just in the event the sky opens up and we get some knee high.

It would depend on how much I would have to handle the 2 ski hardcase.

I could also rent a pair of fatties out there but would have to check out their selection of big snow skis before heading out and maybe even reserving a pair.

Have a great trip and would love to hear all about it when you return.

Best,
Gary


stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2006, 08:37:02 am »
I will definitely be reporting back once I return from Chile. I want to get one more pair of skis I think but I'm having a tough time of deciding. I currently have the iM72's so I could stay with Head and get the iM88 or I could sell the iM72's to my brother and get the Legend 8000's as the one ski quiver or I could keep the iM72's and get the Legend 8800. I need help!!!!

Gary

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2006, 12:03:25 pm »
Well in my opinioin, you should get a supurb hard snow ski that is versatile enough to go from hard pack to boot high, bumps and crud...eg my RX8's....

Then, get something like the IM82 or IM88 for those big snow day we may be lucky enough to get to ski each year. I personally think these are both more versatile than the 8000.

At least, this is the direction that made sense for me.

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2006, 01:14:05 pm »
Gary,

Are you a old school type of skier or a new school type of skier? I am an old school type skier with my feet very tight together. The RX8 has some pretty extreme sidecuts seems like that would make it more difficult in the bumps/moguls. Usually if there is an extreme sidecut the ski has a harder time skidding with a soft edge. Is your experience with this ski different? I know I need to demo but all the snow is gone so all I am left with are questions.

Steve

Gary

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2006, 08:47:49 am »
Hey Steve,
I am a huge fan and follower of Harold PMTS...tipping, counter, floating between turns, O frame type skiing all as my primary ski style. This means skiing with your feet fairly close together with a very quiet cenetered upper body and the? use of upper and lower body separation. Using one foot skiing on the hard pack and firm snow adding in 2 feet in crud, powder, and the soft edge turns.

I found the RX8's to do the work for me in the the crud and bumps. There certainly are more radical sidecuts out there. I feel the dimensions on this ski make it very user friendly.

As another tool in my ski skills, I understand the soft edge and took an all day clinic with the ski doc..John Clendenin in Aspen this year and really enjoyed learning more about the soft edge.

Used his techniuqe efficiently with the RX8's. You can ski these skis flat in the bumps and crud using the soft edge or the uphill edge of the uphill ski.

Interesting, I bought my RX8's without a demo and have not looked back. I'm 155lbs level 8-9 skier and find this ski to be my favorite all time ski to date. I have a friend who is a strong level 6 skier, big guy, 240lbs that jumps around on his using lord knows what ski technique, but he loves them.

What I can tell you is that if you have the capability to ski on one ski at some point in your turns really putting the ski on edge and commtting to it...you will be treated to a supurb experience of confidence the ski hands out. It's rock solid on edge.

Having said that, if you're not quite there or don't expect to be, it's still a ski that is very user friendly capable of handling different ski techniques as well as different snow conditions exceptionally well.

Hope this helps,

Gary

Ron

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2006, 09:31:29 am »
Listen to Guru Gary! If you are skiing old School, be careful, the new skis are not really desinged to skid and you may be getting in over your head and fast with an advanced/expert ski. If you have the 72's stick with them, if not maybe you can rent/demo the 8's in Portillo. They are great skis and they are accomodating as well. They are a stronger ski IMHO than the 72. The 72's is a very accomodating ski that you can learn to carve on but won't kick your butt if your skidding. If you are interested in learning moderns skiing, I would stay away from anything over that 72 or 74 max.

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2006, 01:21:53 pm »
I'm not sure if I understand the difference from old school and modern sking style. I am a very strong recreational skier with no formal training so I am not aware of all the terminology. I basically have always gotten by with my athleticism. I will skid sometimes on purpose not by mistake, sometimes I'll carve a hard sharp turn. My legs are always together....when I say together I mean they are attached at the heels. There is little or no seperation between the feet. However, if I bust out some serious speed I will definitely widen my stance for stability. Explain to me what's the differnece between old and new school style.

Ron

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2006, 07:43:35 am »
WEll, that's another story all together!  GARY, Jim, Michael ??????

Essentially, the new school method has two different "schools", one is PMTS and the other is PSIA. Regardless, the general concept is that with shaped skis you let the edges do the work by tipping inside of the downhill ski ski and tipping the outside of the uphill ski as opposed to turning with active movement of the body as with "old school" skiing where skidding is the drivng force to achieve turns.  With Pmts, the skis are very close together, not usually touching in PSIA, the skis are usually a few inches apart. I have been taught a kind of mix between the two.

That's a super reduced version that will kick off a whole debate!

stekan

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2006, 08:05:06 am »
Essentially, the new school method has two different "schools", one is PMTS and the other is PSIA.
True for States, but there is something called "the rest of the World". I saw some people skiing here in Europe, unaware of PMTS or PSIA.

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2006, 10:18:17 am »
Ya I don't mean to take the issue in a totally different direction but I hear people saying, "i'm new school" or "I'm old school" I learned how to ski about 25 years ago so I assume that I am old school but how do I know? How can I tell? I've been saying that I ski old school. When I turn I definitely keep my feet tight together. I also ski on both edges attempting to keep even pressure on both edges. However, I usually end up with more like 60% downhill and 40% uphill. What does all this mean? I have no idea!!! just that it allows me to ski wherever I want on the mountain in just about any condition with slight variations to technic to adapt to different conditions and situations.

Ron

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2006, 11:50:45 am »
Ahh, let the games begin!  See already one descenting opinion from our non-us poster.  Hmm, lets all hold hands now. PS- My instructor for the past 3 years is a Aussie Natl instructor.  Do you feel better now?

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2006, 09:03:21 pm »
OK...I'm getting the feeling like I touched on a sensitive topic. Let's save that discussion for another thread. So how about that ski season? ::)

Ron

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2006, 11:57:14 am »
you have no idea............... ........... ;D

stwildcat

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2006, 12:25:37 pm »
ANy suggestions on where to stay or any good deals or if I should look into another resort in south america?

Ron

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Re: Portillo, Chile
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2006, 08:14:49 am »
go over to www.epicski.com and check out that site. Look in the resorts section. You can also post. There are a large number of hard cores over there.