Author Topic: Waxing irons  (Read 716 times)

Svend

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2013, 10:47:28 am »
Byron, you should check out the thread here from a couple of years ago about "scrapeless waxing".  It describes a method that requires no scraping, and therefore minimal mess.  I use it, modified slightly, pretty much all the time now.  You can go to the Swix website for a video of how it's done.  If you want to try it, let me know, and I'll post my mods that have given me better durability / longer lasting wax job.

For a basic tuning kit, I would recommend the following:

- waxing iron
- plastic scraper (you will need this even if you do use the scrapeless method, such as to get the thick layer of summer wax off, new ski saturation waxing, etc.)
- brass brush for cleaning the bases and for brushing out hard, cold temp waxes
- nylon brush for brushing out mid and warm temp waxes
- side edge guide / file holder (adjustable or fixed angle; 2 deg. or 3 deg.)
- base edge guide / file holder (adjustable or fixed angle; 1 deg. is standard)
- fine chrome file (small one is fine)
- diamond stone
- gummi stone
- PTEX repair candles; or flat sticks if you have a repair iron - I use a dual-temp soldering iron on low setting, flat blade tip...works great
- steel scraper for cleaning up base repairs (I would never use a steel scraper for wax removal, for risk of damaging the bases)
- Swix Fiberlene paper or other thin absorbent paper for doing the scrapeless wax
- vise

You can find complete kits on sale at some online outlet stores like Steep and Cheap, Backcountry Outlet, etc..  Some of the items you can buy as you need them (repair sticks, steel scraper, etc.), but the basic sharpening and waxing tools you should get all at once.

I like Mike's idea of the boot sole blank.  Clever.  I'll have to see about making some.  And heed his advice about standing clear when popping the heel piece.  ;D  My nose is a big target  ;D

Hope this helps...


byronm

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2013, 09:02:59 pm »
Thx LP & Svend for the info...
 
Svend...I will definately check out the scrapeless waxing thread and some video.
 
Re; tuning tools....I am inclined to get "all the parts" at once and throw them in an old tackle box or something...so's pieces don't get misplaced, etc.
 
For the "FIRST WAX" on the new skis I have coming in.....what do you recommend?
 
Vise issue resolved.  I had vise that I think is going to work perfect sitting under my nose all the time.
 
Great Info guys...thx
 
 

Svend

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2013, 09:35:00 pm »
For the "FIRST WAX" on the new skis I have coming in.....what do you recommend?

Check out the Swix site again.  They have a method for saturation waxing of a new pair (also to be used on an existing pair after a base grind).  Basically several coats of warm temp wax applied with no scraping between coats; final coat gets scraped while still warm and soft; let cool; then apply finishing wax of choice.

« Last Edit: February 11, 2013, 06:38:40 am by Svend »

byronm

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2013, 10:21:07 pm »
Great info!! on the Swix School site Svend thx....wealth of info there....although, until I found the right button...thought I was going to have to order rosetta stone or solicit your services for interpretation.... ;D
« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 10:26:30 pm by byronm »

byronm

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2013, 01:08:09 am »
Quote
1) Drip molten wax onto bases (sparingly, not an excessive amount, but enough to cover with a thin uniform layer; practice will tell you how much to drip on); then iron in without using Fiberlene, making three complete passes up and down the ski to really get the PTEX warm and absorb the wax.

2) Do a single slow pass (20 seconds from tip to tail) with the iron with a piece of Fiberlene between iron and base; this evens out the wax, picks up dirt (a lot!), and takes up excess wax.  I use a double layer of the paper, because a single layer is too thin and I end up just ripping it.

3) Take the now-saturated piece of Fiberlene and do a brief short pass over the tip again to deposit a thin layer where the paper left the base dry.

4) Remove paper and discard; do a final pass with the iron to even out the wax (this is probably overkill, but it makes it feel like a more thorough job).

5) Let cool and brush briefly with the appropriate brush to open up some structure; the first couple of runs will take off whatever excess wax is left on there, but the brush grooves will still give decent glide.

6) Go skiing!!!

Is this what you are still doing Svend?

Svend

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2013, 06:36:15 am »
Yup, that's it.  I forgot that I had posted that.  I found that just crayoning the wax on, as per Swix's technique, didn't give a very durable coat and I had to reapply after only one or two days out.  Using the slightly modified technique of dripping and ironing in gives me the same durability as a traditional iron and scrape wax....about 3 days.

Re. saturation waxing, I forgot to mention that you should also do this after a base grind (prev. post has been edited).

Svend

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Re: Waxing irons
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2013, 07:22:55 pm »
Byron, you should check out the thread here from a couple of years ago about "scrapeless waxing".  It describes a method that requires no scraping, and therefore minimal mess.  I use it, modified slightly, pretty much all the time now.  You can go to the Swix website for a video of how it's done.  If you want to try it, let me know, and I'll post my mods that have given me better durability / longer lasting wax job.

For a basic tuning kit, I would recommend the following:

- waxing iron
- plastic scraper (you will need this even if you do use the scrapeless method, such as to get the thick layer of summer wax off, new ski saturation waxing, etc.)
- brass brush for cleaning the bases and for brushing out hard, cold temp waxes
- nylon brush for brushing out mid and warm temp waxes
- side edge guide / file holder (adjustable or fixed angle; 2 deg. or 3 deg.)
- base edge guide / file holder (adjustable or fixed angle; 1 deg. is standard)
- fine chrome file (small one is fine)
- diamond stone
- gummi stone
- PTEX repair candles; or flat sticks if you have a repair iron - I use a dual-temp soldering iron on low setting, flat blade tip...works great
- steel scraper for cleaning up base repairs (I would never use a steel scraper for wax removal, for risk of damaging the bases)
- Swix Fiberlene paper or other thin absorbent paper for doing the scrapeless wax
- vise

You can find complete kits on sale at some online outlet stores like Steep and Cheap, Backcountry Outlet, etc..  Some of the items you can buy as you need them (repair sticks, steel scraper, etc.), but the basic sharpening and waxing tools you should get all at once.

I like Mike's idea of the boot sole blank.  Clever.  I'll have to see about making some.  And heed his advice about standing clear when popping the heel piece.  ;D  My nose is a big target  ;D

Hope this helps...

I should add, that at some point you should consider getting a sidewall planer.  You will eventually file and polish enough off the side edges that your stones and files will be rubbing on the plastic sidewall and will no longer cut the metal edge.  The result is that you will never get the edges truly sharp.  Planing a whisker off the sidewall will open up the metal edge again and get you back in business.  Well worth the investment -- I have a basic Ski Man one and it works great.