Author Topic: Krypton Pro boots  (Read 3192 times)

Svend

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Krypton Pro boots
« on: April 10, 2012, 07:14:21 am »
I'm looking for some feedback from anyone familiar with the Dalbello Krypton Pro boots.  I've been interested in these for some time, since I tried on a pair a couple of years ago and found them to be an exceedingly good fit, and had a very smooth progressive flex pattern.  Didn't end up buying them, but have had them in the back of my mind ever since. 

As of the end of this season, I'm finding my own boots (Tecnica Inferno 110) a bit on the soft side, and somewhat lacking in edge grip.  They are a very good fit for me right out of the box, but they do come up short in performance at times.  Side note:  I will try to up their performance with some Booster straps, which I will try in Banff in a couple of weeks, but in the end, I think I might need like some new boots.

The 3-piece boot design seems to be gaining some traction, with Nordica's introduction of the Firearrow line, and Dalbello's expansion of their own model lines.  The Kryptons certainly have their devotees, if some of the reviews on Epic are to be believed.  And their advantages seem to be numerous wrt. easy adjustment of flex, alignment and fit.

So...has anyone here have experience with these? Skis, or has skied in them?

In particular, I am concerned about two things:  rebound and power to the edge.  For rebound, I have read that the 3-piece boots do not have the same ability to help the skier return to neutral, as does a good overlap boot.  Is this true?

And regarding edge grip, I want my next boots to have better edge grip than my Tecnicas.  When I switched from a Lange Comp Pro to the Inferno, I lost a significant amount of edge grip, just by switching boots.  And I want it back, darn it!

Any other pros and cons of these boots that you know of, let's hear it....

Thanks!

« Last Edit: April 10, 2012, 07:17:13 am by Svend »


LivingProof

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2012, 08:13:09 am »
Svend,

My boot review experience is very limited as I've been in traditional 4 buckle Nordica Speedmachine 130 for 4 full seasons. In Tahoe, I tried on several 130 4 buckle designs to determine if I could downsize, but, all were very painful at the toe area.

Going back several seasons, Dalbello had many advocates in the Epic forums, but, the majority seemed to be western soft snow skiers. In this forum, Bushwacker continues to ski Dalbello ( I believe, in part, because he has very wide foot ). High Angles skis on both Dalbello and a 4 buckle Head, so, I hope he will comment. The Epic reviews of the new 3 buckle Nordica Firearrow are mixed. Harb is not a fan of either Dalbello or Technica, and he sure knows boots. Harbs thinking is that stiff boots keep you centered better as pushing boots forward is wasted energy.

I detect a growing movement from Dalbello back to 4 buckle, Philpug and Ron made the transition after years of major Dalbello love. Both don't look back.

At your size and growing skill level, I say go for a 130 4 buckle design. You need to go through the process of trying each for fit. I would be surprised if most who post here would disagree with the 130 4 buckle design recommendation. I would wait a year and see if Fisher gets their fitting/liner issues resolved on the new 130 shrink wrap boots.

 I don't think Booster straps will aide you existing boots, I have a pair not in use, so, if you want them, let me know.

 

HighAngles

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2012, 12:20:38 pm »
If the shell fits and it's the right flex then it's a good boot for you.  However, I find that most people are led astray by the boot liner.  Ignore the liner and find the shell that best matches your foot.  Try lots and lots of shells.  I think I tried everything available until I found that the Head Raptor shell matches my foot best.  Get your foot into the smallest shell possible.  I believe that skiers looking for a performance fit should strive for the least amount of liner between their foot and the shell.  That's what leads to a truly responsive boot fit.  If you have a very good fit then you will have good circulation which means you will have warm feet.

I skied in the original Dalbello Krypton for one season when it was first introduced.  I found that the shell didn't match my foot well enough and went back to skiing in Flexon/Full Tilt shells.  I had tried a number of times to go to a traditional 2-piece 4-buckle boot, but those attempts were not accompanied by an exhaustive search like I went through last season.  Now that I've spent a lot of time skiing in the Head Raptor 130RS and B3 RD I can't imagine ever being able to get the same performance out of the currently available 3-piece boots.  But that's just me - YMMV.  I do miss the easy on/off of a 3-piece though (but lots of silicone spray definitely helps with the Raptors  :D).

Note that next season Dalbello will have the new KR2, the second generation of the Krypton shell.  The new shell owes a lot to the Scorpion line of racing-inspired boots and has a much more anatomical fit.  I tried on the 26, but I'm really a 25 shell and those won't come out of manufacturing until next Fall.  Nonetheless, I think that the KR2 is significantly improved and well worth waiting for if you're seriously considering the Krypton.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2012, 01:48:51 pm by HighAngles »

Svend

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2012, 08:15:40 pm »
Mike -- any particular reason why Harb doesn't like Tecnica? Not that I hang on his every word (or any of his words, for that matter, not being one of his disciples), but I'm interested to know.  FYI, the Krypton Pro is a narrow-lasted boot (98mm) with a stiff flex which is adjustable up to 140 using replaceable tongues and spine widgets.  I don't think it will be too soft fore-aft  :D and will be a substantial bump up the stiffness scale from my Inferno 110's. 

I should point out, however, with flex indices varying so much between brands, the 110 on my Tecnicas feels about the same as the 120 did on my Langes.  Just laterally not as powerful as the Langes. 

That said, I am definitely ready for a 130.  I found that with my present boots, driving a stout ski like my Mythics through crud and heavy snow was not as "assertive" as I would have liked.

H-A:  thanks for your insight.  I take it that you have nothing against the Krypton, in general? Any reason why the performance isn't up to a good 2-piece shell? This is really the crux of my question, so curious to know more.

And no worries, I'm savvy to the shell fit being paramount.  When testing boots, my first try is always with the liner out.  Although I must admit that I've been paying attention only to the lower shell around forefoot and instep.  I should probably learn what to look for in a good shell fit at heel and upper cuff as well.

BTW, the Krypton I tried a few years ago was different from today's design.  The new shell has been altered a bit in the forefoot, making it roomier there, but retaining the narrow fit elsewhere.  I haven't tried this latest version on for size. But what you said about the next year's changes have me interested.  I will try to find more on this and see if it's worth the wait.

As an aside, I had an interesting conversation with a boot guy in a local shop here re. the differences between Tecnica and Lange wrt. edge grip.  His response was that the shell shape (rounded vs. flat where foot meets shell), the solid build of the lower shell to the inside of the foot, and the positioning of the foot laterally over the inside edge of the ski, were some of the reasons that Langes have such excellent edge power. 

My Tecnicas are actually an excellent fit.  I'm normally a 27.5, but these are a 26.5.  They feel like surgical gloves, completely enveloping my feet with even pressure.  Especially snug heel, instep, and cuff hold.  No hot spots, no grinding needed, and warm too (= good circulation).  Just a bit of fore-aft and cuff alignment was all they needed.  I can ski in them all day without aches or pains.  They are so close in fit, in fact, that if I wear a medium-thickness ski sock instead of my usual thin ones, my feet hurt after 30 minutes.  I don't think I could ask for a better shell fit from a 2-piece boot.  If I was confident that a 130 flex version of the same shell would give me better edge power, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a pair on the spot. 
« Last Edit: April 10, 2012, 09:15:16 pm by Svend »

bushwacka

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2012, 05:07:21 am »
Svend,

My boot review experience is very limited as I've been in traditional 4 buckle Nordica Speedmachine 130 for 4 full seasons. In Tahoe, I tried on several 130 4 buckle designs to determine if I could downsize, but, all were very painful at the toe area.

Going back several seasons, Dalbello had many advocates in the Epic forums, but, the majority seemed to be western soft snow skiers. In this forum, Bushwacker continues to ski Dalbello ( I believe, in part, because he has very wide foot ). High Angles skis on both Dalbello and a 4 buckle Head, so, I hope he will comment. The Epic reviews of the new 3 buckle Nordica Firearrow are mixed. Harb is not a fan of either Dalbello or Technica, and he sure knows boots. Harbs thinking is that stiff boots keep you centered better as pushing boots forward is wasted energy.

I detect a growing movement from Dalbello back to 4 buckle, Philpug and Ron made the transition after years of major Dalbello love. Both don't look back.

At your size and growing skill level, I say go for a 130 4 buckle design. You need to go through the process of trying each for fit. I would be surprised if most who post here would disagree with the 130 4 buckle design recommendation. I would wait a year and see if Fisher gets their fitting/liner issues resolved on the new 130 shrink wrap boots.

 I don't think Booster straps will aide you existing boots, I have a pair not in use, so, if you want them, let me know.

krypton are a 98 mm shell that I have punched out to fit my foot which as you said is very wide.

I continue to use them because they are superior for skiing how I do, where I like to. there is not a single four buckle boot out there that lets you ankles flex  move as freely as this boot at this is important for how I ski. Mot people will hate them when they make the switch. If your use to a boot holding you up these even at their stiffest 140 flex setting are going to feel like hell because most people do not have strong enough lower legs to actually support themselves.  Even at 140 the flex since it has no stop point will feel soft to people use to plug boots or other 4 buckle boots.

Pros - The other great reason for this boot is the heel hold is accomplished though a buckle and not though a shell fit. for my wide foot it is impossible to find a boot that wide enough for the foot but low enough in the instep to hold my heel from moving. IN kryptons my heel does not move.

- easy to get on and off. No hair dryer needed.

- intution liners are stock. They keep my foot warm and fit better than anything else.

- lighter than most other alpine boots

- lateral they are pretty stiff

- because of 3 piece design with the buckle undone it is VERY easy to hike and skin in.

-extremely adjustable at home with cuff alignment, flex adjustment, and forward lean. Also has hard and soft boot bed. flex is really adjustable from 80-160.  I run mine stiffer than any stock configuration for GS and SL gates and about 130 for the 2 super G races I did this year.

Cons
 - will not give you power transmission of a plug boot, but I would argue for someone like myself who is nearly 100 percent off trail skier that power transmission is a performance inhibitor.

- for people with weak lower legs or balance skills this boot will suck untill they get use to it.

- the cuff flex travels inwards making it not as responsive to tipping as boots that harb likes, this is a IMO a valid concern but fixable. I moved the inside cuff hinge point on my forward and the outsides ones back letting my knees track outward instead of inward. Gave me alot better edge grip on harder snow.

I will never switch to a 4 buckle race boot till someone can hang with me for one day skiing one. I usually see alot of ugly skiing from people skiing 4 buckle boots which are optimized for groomers and not for off trail. The reason why so many people hate cabrio boots is because they are different and you are not going to like them in one day.

As for the nordica the volume is way to high for my foot but if you have a high volume foot its a decent boot if not as adjustable as the krypton. Lateral it is the stiffest boot I have ever skied on.

Tecnica suck except their plug boot. I used their 130 narrow lasted boot this year and the flex was fracked up on it. IT felt like it was 170 flex until you really pushed into it and then it basically folded in half. hard to maintain fore and aft balance when its opposite of what my kryptons are.



jim-ratliff

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2012, 07:04:18 am »
The post above by Bushwacka, in my opinion, is very well done.
And an excellent summary of  him picking a boot that fits well with his skiing. If this were facebook, I would give him a "like" or whatever they do over there.


disclaimer.  I don't have a faceboot account or a twitter account.  I am trying to keep as much of my life hidden from the Chinese as possible.

« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 07:06:52 am by jim-ratliff »
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Svend

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2012, 04:08:21 pm »
Josh, thanks for a very complete and informative reply.  Kudos!

Am I correct in my interpretation of your post, that the Krypton is better suited to off-piste skiing? But then, you use it for racing too.  So there must be enough power to the edge and snow feel to do duty in the gates (?).  I spend about 2/3rds of my time on hard snow (east), and 1/3rd out west, so am really looking for a boot that has good edge power and snow feel for hard snow, but is still capable off-piste. 

As for lower leg strength and balance, I don't think that will be an issue, When I ski off-piste and in crud and bumps, I'm in a pretty neutral stance in my boots and don't drive my shins to hold me up or pressure the shovels -- more or less even pressure fore and aft in the cuffs.  And this with the forward lean in my Tecnicas being pushed ahead quite a bit using thick cuff shims.  I can ski all day like that, so shouldn't have any problem with a boot like the Krypton, which can't hold me upright.  OTOH, on-piste carving is different, and I pressure the shovels a fair amount.

Wither Tecnica? There sure isn't a lot of love here for that brand.  As I said, mine fit great, and I would keep them if they had more edge power and were a bit stiffer fore-aft.  FWIW, the flex pattern is very smooth and progressive, with a long range of motion, all of which I really like and helped sell me on this boot.

Josh, which Tecnica did you have? I'm guessing the Bodacious? Is that one based on the Inferno shell? Any comments on the Inferno 130 semi-plug boot (98mm version)?

Mike -- you mentioned that Phil moved from a Krypton to a 4-buckle boot.  The Tecnica Inferno 130 was the boot that he switched to (see his review on Epic).  Also, I wanted to ask you what the Nordica Doberman boots are like.  I know little about those, other than they have an excellent reputation as being a no-nonsense, high quality boot.  How would you describe their fit and flex pattern? Are you happy with their performance?

Quote
- the cuff flex travels inwards making it not as responsive to tipping as boots that harb likes, this is a IMO a valid concern but fixable. I moved the inside cuff hinge point on my forward and the outsides ones back letting my knees track outward instead of inward. Gave me alot better edge grip on harder snow.

This is an interesting comment.  Apparently Atomic is coming out with a new performance boot for 2013 (to replace their 98mm Burner series) that will have a cuff alignment mechanism that can move the hinge points forward or backward.  This is to tweak the inside/outside tracking of the knees when flexing.  Cool.  And innovative.

« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 05:49:32 pm by Svend »

LivingProof

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 06:57:06 am »
,
Mike -- you mentioned that Phil moved from a Krypton to a 4-buckle boot.  The Tecnica Inferno 130 was the boot that he switched to (see his review on Epic).  Also, I wanted to ask you what the Nordica Doberman boots are like.  I know little about those, other than they have an excellent reputation as being a no-nonsense, high quality boot.  How would you describe their fit and flex pattern? Are you happy with their performance?

[/quote]

Svend,
You are correct that Phil did make the transition to Technica and gives them high marks. I believe a prime reason that he left Dalbello is that his shop does not carry that that boot. He wants to be on a boot that he sells.

FWIW, a small primer into PMTS boot thinking. HH writes that the proper place for the leg to be, in all phases of the turn, is between the rear of the boot and the front of the boot. The shin should lightly touch the front of the boot. Said another way, "Don't Push Plastic". The benefit of a stiff boot is that it helps to recover the centered leg position when balance is moved too far back or forward in skiing. The angles created by the ankle in the boot remain constant in his school of skiing. That why many PMTS skiers ski in 150 boots, like Helluva, John and Max. I'm not advocating you seek a 150.

So, my skiing thoughts are never to test the forward flexing of a boot, in the shop or on the hill. The temperature changes between the two are extreme and I don't see the value of flexing a warm boot. I want a boot rigid that compliments PMTS tipping concepts. If asked how my boots flex, the answer is "they don't". I drink the cool aide in my thinking.

I think the Dan Boisevert may ski in a Dobie 130 and I believe Max skied in that boot prior to moving on up. They are narrow last and low volume boots, with a lot of material available to be removed via grinding. I would consider that boot in the future, although they are ancient by todays boot life standard. Phil just did a review a new boot Nordica has for next year, called Back to Black, which seems to update the Dobie 130. If you find one in your travels, try it on! And if you find one in a 29, let me know!


HighAngles

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2012, 07:44:59 am »
Good post Mike and you kind of point out an important distinction between current 3-piece boots and traditional 2-piece race-inspired boots.  My Head Raptors are ideal for what I refer to as "foot skiing" whereas the Flexon/Krypton promotes more "leg skiing".

We've discussed this before on the PMTS forum, but for the benefit of the Peak Skiers here's a quick version of my thoughts.  Narrow 2-piece race inspired boots fit the foot very closely and are quite responsive in transmitting foot movements to your skis.  Foot movements are the foundation of PMTS skiing.  Harald has pointed out in his videos and online that you should not need to tighten the top of a race flex boot tightly on your leg.  He keeps his top buckle fairly loose.  One of the reasons I LOVE my Raptors is that they have the double-power Booster strap as OEM.  I trimmed away the plastic at the top front of the cuff so that my Booster strap is only against the liner, thus the strap "connects" my lower leg to the rear spine of the boot (where 2-piece shells get their forward/rearward flex support).  The double-power Booster lets me keep the top buckle loose while providing a really nice progressive flex.  The progressive forward flex provided by this setup is as good (if not better) than a Flexon/Krypton with their separate plastic tongue.  There is no "hard stop" when flexing forward with my Raptor setup.  The Booster strap just gets progressively more taught until it no longer stretches any further.

I find that the Flexon/Krypton boots need to be tightened around the lower leg to maintain sufficient control of your skis.  When your boot is tightened around your lower leg your foot movements aren't nearly as efficient or effective in producing tipping power.  Thus these boots turn you into a "leg skier" where you're using the gross motor movements of your legs to achieve ski tipping.  I think the reason for this is the buckle placement on these boots.  Although the ankle buckle (or Dynalink in Krypton terms) seems like a good idea for pulling your foot back into the pocket, I've found that having 2 buckles (just above the ankle and over the instep) combined with a stronger lower shell provide much better holding power for my feet.  Now I have a low instep so it's quite possible that a different foot shape may not have quite the same issues in a Flexon/Krypton, but I'd be surprised if this isn't the same case for a lot of skiers.

My Raptors fit my feet so well that I can leave the buckles completely undone with just the Booster strap tightened and I can ski just fine.  In fact when I ski relaxed with my kids that is exactly how I keep my boots.

Svend

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2012, 08:57:28 am »
H-A, Mike,

This is interesting stuff.  I can see the logic of a stiff boot limiting your fore and aft movement on hard groomed snow, but how does that translate to 3D snow - crud, bumps, powder? Would not the ability to have some fore-aft movement in your boots be a benefit? Allow you more ability to maintain balance by adjusting stance? I'm just trying to think through how I ski that stuff, and while I definitely see the need for a stiffer boot (being the original reason for starting this thread) to help power through the deep crud, I don't think I would want to go too far with this and be totally "locked in" and rigid.

Mike, I think you were right on in your first reply -- a good 130 flex would be the ticket.  Well chosen, and given my height and weight, a 130 flex boot would give me enough fore-aft range to recenter and balance in rough snow, yet give me more of the power and assertiveness that I'm looking for.

And no worries, I don't take the flex stiffness in the shop to mean anything.  But I do flex the boots to see what range of motion I might have, how progressive the resistance feels as I move forward, what happens to the lower cuff and shell when I flex, as well as if the fit changes from the deformation.  As for stiffness, on a cold day, even my 110's are plenty stiff.

H-A, thanks for insight into the Booster strap and comparison to the Krypton design.  That's really good to know that I can get that nice smooth forward flex and range of motion that feels so compelling in the Krypton, but still get the power of a solid 2-piece narrow lasted shell.  I like it! Considering that I spend so much time on hard eastern snow, but still ski western mountains a significant amount, this will be a good combination. 

FWIW, my Inferno's are designed to have the power strap sit half-on and half-off the upper cuff and tongue, if you can picture what I mean.  The forward flex is nice and smooth, but it would be easy to slip the strap fully under the cuff so all of it snugs on the tongue -- I'll try it next week to see how it feels.  On my wife's Lange RS110's, I actually cut the upper piece of cuff off so that the strap sits full on the tongue.  Lange was smart enough to mold a scribe mark into the cuff for just that purpose.  She loves it.

Quote
I think the Dan Boisevert may ski in a Dobie 130 and I believe Max skied in that boot prior to moving on up. They are narrow last and low volume boots, with a lot of material available to be removed via grinding. I would consider that boot in the future, although they are ancient by todays boot life standard. Phil just did a review a new boot Nordica has for next year, called Back to Black, which seems to update the Dobie 130. If you find one in your travels, try it on! And if you find one in a 29, let me know!

Size 29, eh? That will cost you extra freight for me to ship boots that big  ;D

Seriously, I'll keep an eye out for them.  From Phil's review, it sounds like they might be a perfect fit for me too, as he is in the stiffer version of my boot (Inferno shell), and the Nordie's fit him even better.  And I love the boss colours.  8)  Maybe my kids will respect and fear me more if I wear those.  Ha!

Guys, thanks for all the great feedback.  You've upped my level of knowledge about boot design and fitting a great deal, and helped me focus in on a set of criteria that will be important for a good match.

It will be fun to kick around some shops in the coming weeks trying boots.  I've got a mental short list of ones that I think might work, based on past trials, and I want to try some others again that didn't fit so well a few years ago to see if they've changed.  Will keep you posted.

Cheers,
Svend
« Last Edit: April 14, 2012, 09:08:10 am by Svend »

HighAngles

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2012, 02:27:52 pm »
So I ran a little experiment this morning on a bit of a powder day in CO.  I grabbed my old ZipFit Plug Leather liner to use with a Flexon/Full Tilt shell.  The idea was to use a liner that could provide a tighter fit (especially over the instep since it is a tongued liner) and more power and see if there's any way to effectively "resurrect" my use of a Flexon shell depending on conditions or logistics of a ski trip.

The ZipFit definitely makes the Flexon feel much more "substantial", but even with the #10 tongue installed (the stiffest flex available) I could easily over power the boot.  It just doesn't provide the support of my Raptors. 

Another key observation was that even though the ZipFit holds my foot much more closely, I could still feel the bones of my foot and ankle moving around more.  Because the Flexon does not have an anatomical shape in the lower shell, the plastic doesn't really help hold your foot and ankle in place.  This is why I think that anyone considering the Krypton should really wait for the KR2.  The inside of the KR2 looks very much like the inside of the Dalbello Scorpion racing boots. 

I ski in ZipFits in my Raptor 130RS and B3 RD shells.  It's a great match and I like that the ZipFits allow me to get into smaller shell sizes without requiring any shell work.

Although stock liners have definitely improved in recent years, keep in mind that the liner generally doesn't get a lot of R&D and the quality of the materials can be quite lacking.  The foam used in stock liners will pack out - sometimes relatively quickly and then you're left with possibly needing additional boot work to resolve a fit problem.  ZipFit liners don't pack out, ever.  They break-in a little, but you never will lose the fit you get from day 1 until their last day when they fall apart (which could be some 700 ski days later).  ZipFits look to be really expensive until you consider what the investment means for your skiing and how long they will provide their top notch performance.  I heard from Chris B. that Harald is actually back in a ZipFit in his Dodge Boots (he was previously foamed). 

The main take away here is don't trust in your liner to provide your boot fit.  For higher performance skiers you really need the shell to fit your foot, ankle, and lower leg as closely as possible while still being comfortable for all day skiing.

jim-ratliff

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2012, 04:30:14 pm »
I got Zipfit for my Raptors (but mine are not the130 flex) and really like them.
And I've found that keeping the liner on while putting on or taking off boots has become my standard. Very easy (with some silicone spray). The other advantage is being able to reuse the liners in new boots.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 09:47:20 pm by jim-ratliff »
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Svend

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2012, 08:51:50 pm »
H-A, you mean you tested the Full Tilt's just for me? Or to satisfy your own curiosity? Either way, that is simply brilliant.  Stellar service to a fellow Peak Skier, sir! Thank you very much.

The outcome of your trial is really interesting, esp. that you were able to overpower the stiffest tongue on that boot.  I don't know your specs, but I am 6'2" and 220 lbs in my boxers, so that boot will likely not cut it for me either.  Not sure how that translates to the stiffness of the Krypton Pro with the stiffest tongue and spine widgets in place, but if I find a pair to try, I'll certainly see if they are substantial enough for me.

I'm really looking forward to starting the boot search.  Should be a lot of fun.  And I want to take my time and get it right this time.  I've had three pairs of boots in 6 years, two of which were in the past 3 years.  I want the next pair to last me at least 4 to 5 years, so no rush to buy.  I regret being too hasty in my last boot purchase.  Only tried a couple of pairs, fell in love with the fit of the Tecnicas and bought 'em.  Should have gone for a stiffer pair, and grown into them. 

I checked out the Zipfit site -- looks like a great product.   And I share a first name with the founder -- not a common moniker on this continent.  Cool!  8)

I knew nothing about Zipfit until now.  Not cheap, but seem to be well worth it.  Definitely a must-do when a liner packs out.  Although my Tecnica liners still feel like new after about 40 days in them, I may not have the same luck with my next boots.

« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 08:55:14 pm by Svend »

jim-ratliff

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2012, 09:49:51 pm »
Svend:


OK, maybe you're feeling guilty about too many boots?
So let me ask a leading question. Would any boot you would have selected 5 years ago, no matter how carefully, still be the right boot for you now, given the changes in your skiing in the past 5 years.

"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

bushwacka

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Re: Krypton Pro boots
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2012, 06:27:40 am »
whats not making sense here is earlier in the thread people were saying that your lower leg should be positioned behind the front of the boots and in front of the back boot. If that is true how do you over power any boot?

Also ankle flex is important to be able to stay centered while flexed, being able to jump, being able to absorb and most people who do not like the feeling do not have strong enough lower legs. Kryptons will takes dozen of days to you start to be able to exploit and probably love the new found movement.

lastly zipfits are a cold heavy liner.  not well suited to what I do at all.