Author Topic: Rossignol Strato 70TI length  (Read 1617 times)

BlueTommy

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Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« on: November 05, 2011, 03:29:21 pm »
Hello:
42 yo male, 169 pounds, 66 inches...level 6-7.
Would Strato 70 TI 2011...in 165 cm be appropriate for me?
Primary use in Northern Michigan...groomers only.
Best Regards and thanks for input.

BlueTommy


Svend

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2011, 04:30:55 pm »
Hi BlueTommy,

Are you just asking whether the length is right for you? If so, then yes, the 165 should work great for your height and weight.  One of the guys on this forum is about your height and weight, expert skier, and owns or has owned skis in that length range, 163 to 167, as his hard snow skis.  My wife is 5'7", 130 lbs, advanced, powerful skier, and has three skis in the 160 to 165 range, and they suit her perfectly.

But if you're asking whether that model is the right ski for you, then that's more difficult to answer.  We would need some more info from you.  Skiing style? speed? other skis that you own or demoed? what you liked or disliked about them? have you demoed this model? different length? etc.... 

A couple of general comments:

I'm not familiar with that particular model of Rossi, but I have hefted and flexed the Strato 80Ti.  Not sure if the 70 is similar, but the 80 seemed to be a pretty stiff board, esp. in the shovel.  Having said that, stiff isn't necessarily a bad thing, depending on how you ski.  If you use a lot of leg power and speed to really bend the ski, then you may be OK.  But if you're more finesse or laid back, then a stiff ski may really toss you around, esp. on rough snow, be hard to control, and tire you out very quickly.

Personally, I ski more in the laid back style, but I like speed, and can bend a stiff ski.  But I wouldn't pick the Strato 80Ti -- way too stiff for my taste.  And I'm 6'2", 220 lbs.  I own a couple of high performance skis, but as I said, I thought the overall flex pattern of the Strato 80 was not right for me.  The shovel was just too stiff, which is an attribute I don't care for in a ski.  I like a lot energy in the tail, but prefer a slightly softer shovel to flex and absorb the terrain.  It would be a good idea to compare the 70 and 80 side by side if you can.  They may be completely different in character.

Having said that, much of this is personal taste and preference.  It would be worth it to demo some skis and see what you like and don't like.  OTOH, since you're talking about last year's model, I'm guessing this one is on sale somewhere.  If it's a killer deal, then you may not be risking much by getting them.

Hope this helps.....good luck, and post back here if you buy them -- write a review  ;D

« Last Edit: November 05, 2011, 07:31:50 pm by Svend »

Liam

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2011, 06:14:33 pm »
The Strato 70 is the slalom version of the Strato 80 (I think the 165 has <12m radius).  I have skied it (as the CX70-same model different name the year before).  It comes with a pretty good binding as well.  It's a wonderful slalom carver, great flex, pretty powerful, but not too intimidating under a solid skier.  It kills hard and icy groomers, not horrible in bumps.   

I'd imagine it'd be a great ski for a mid western skier who focuses on technical groomer skiing.  At your height and weight the 165cm is perfect.

BlueTommy

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2011, 05:46:03 am »
Thanks for replies.
Svend, what skis would you say give a more relaxed ride?
 
My days are spent with me and wife alone or with friends in the morning, and then with kids in the afternoon.   
I realize this is not an out west ski, but will be going to colorado to do the same in 2012.  Any thoughts there as well?

Regards,
BT

LivingProof

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2011, 06:52:08 am »
Hi to BlueTommie.......an d welcome to the Real Skiers site.

I did demo the Rossi CX70 that Liam described, and, agree with all that he said. It's a fine carver and for anyone skiing on a smaller mountain, working on short radius carving, it would serve very well. The era of the short radius carver is in decline, and, you will not find a lot of love for narrow skis. Having said that, there are several who post here, including me, who ski narrow skis as a daily driver at our home mountain, and, work on the technique to use them. I agree that a 165 would work, it will be on edge more, more turny and a less stable at speed than a 170. My leaning would be to the 170.

I would like to know more about the types of turns you want to make. If you prefer wider radius turns, go straighter and at higher speeds, then, the ski does not match your style.




meput

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2011, 09:03:08 am »
BlueTommy,

Welcome to the forum, may you ski long and prosper.

I have not skied the strato 70TI. The last Rossi Strato I skied was the original purple one in the late 60's. I do ski on Head's narrow, short radius, carver: the iSuperShape. The subscription RealSkiers Site does give similar comments about the 70TI and the iSS.

I am on my second pair of iSS's. I started off on a pair of 160's. My second pair is 165. I am 5'4'' at 155lbs. I found the 160s worked well when first working on carving technique. I agree with LP  that the longer length is a more stable ride at speed and in chopped up conditions. I still jump on the shorter skis on ice and to work on technique.

Depending on your goals and technique, the 165 for learning carving and hardpack conditions. The 170 if you have perfected carving skills and using the ski in a wider range of conditions.

Hope this helps, meput




Svend

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2011, 11:16:49 am »
Thanks for replies.
Svend, what skis would you say give a more relaxed ride?
 
My days are spent with me and wife alone or with friends in the morning, and then with kids in the afternoon.   
I realize this is not an out west ski, but will be going to colorado to do the same in 2012.  Any thoughts there as well?

Regards,
BT

BT -- I really couldn't say which ski would be more relaxed.  As I mentioned, I have not skied the Strato 70 or even held one in a shop.  I only looked at the 80, and it may be a completely different ski to the 70.  Perhaps Liam or Living Proof could provide some insight as to how forgiving the 70Ti / CX70 is?  And how suitable to your preferred kind of skiing and skill level, terrain?

Like LP said, if you give us some more info about your style, speed, type of turns, etc., then we can give you some feedback.  There are lots of guys here who are always happy to help out with this kind of question.

Cheers,
Svend

Liam

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2011, 12:02:53 pm »
LP's comments are dead on-you do need to consider your approach to skiing to know if this sort of ski is right for you.

I spent some time on a few short radius slalom-esque skis (The Contact 9, CX70, Atomic Metron, Atomic SL11, head sl-never the SS however). They all ski the same-some have more rebound energy or take more commitment to carve, but they all respond best to the same turn mechanics.

You really do need to like short turning-carve everywhere type skiing to really get the most out of them.  If you tend to ski a narrow corridor, in the fall line on hard or groomed snow--then these sort of skis are the ticket.  If you want to play around, or 'cruise' a little more and meander down the trail--any ski with this small of a turn Radii is less 'forgiving' or 'easy.'. 

Slalom shaped skis make it easier to make SLalom turn-- if that's what your after, the CX70/ strato 70ti is one of the best non-race slalom cut skis out there.


Svend

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2011, 06:02:01 pm »
Further to Liam's comments, (sorry if you already know all this) there are also skis that have what is called "dual radius" sidecut .  That is, the tip has sidecut like a slalom ski (short radius), but the tail has a GS shape (longer radius).  These types of skis are really great if you like to mix it up and vary your turn shape, and they really do work well.  Pressure the tips, and they come around in snappy little short turns; stay centered and cruise longer turns.  Very versatile and fun, and they don't force you into making a single type of turn over and over again.  Fischer, Kastle, Nordica and Elan are four brands that use this shape for some of their frontside skis.  The good news is, that they make them in varying stiffness and performance levels, so you will find something that suits.  If this sounds like your cup of tea, let us know and we can recommend a few to look at.  A number of the members here own such skis, as do I.   8)

« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 07:14:37 pm by Svend »

BlueTommy

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2011, 07:34:21 pm »
Svend,
Did not know about dual radius skis....this seems like a great idea.  I enjoy short, fast, precise turns, because where I ski in Michigan, the runs are short.  Groomers, and maybe a few inches of powder that fall overnight.  I usually ski blacks with my friends/wife in the morning and transition to blues  in the afternoon with my kids.  I stay away from bumps and trees. Speed is not important.   
This dual radius ski.....seems to be a great idea. 

BT

Svend

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2011, 06:15:21 am »
Yeah, those skis are very versatile.  If you like making only short turns, then a single-purpose slalom sidecut ski like the ones Liam described would suit just fine.  However, it seems that a dual radius ski may be the ticket for you, esp. for skiing with young kids.  They're like magpies, flitting all over the place, and you sometimes have to make some pretty quick maneuvers to keep up with 'em.  A ski that can make any turn shape just by thinking about it, is brilliant for that.  My wife actually regrets not having a ski like that when our kids were young and learning to ski (I was learning too, and was no help at all  ::) ).  She was on a high performance GS ski that was not amenable to quickness and agility -- she loves those skis, and still owns and uses them, but they weren't the right thing at the time.

So, having said all that, here are a few dual radius boards for you to check out:

Fischer Progressor 8 (last year's) -- light, agile, excellent edge grip on ice, very high speed limit, stable; rather lively; lots of great reviews for these, including here on this forum; high performance but non-demanding.

Fischer Progressor 800 (this year's) -- don't know much about these, but have heard they are very similar to the 8's; if you want more power and race-like build, then there is also the Progressor 9 (last year) and 900 (this year), and also the Progressor 10.

Nordica Spitfire (not the EDT/Pro models, but the base model) -- similar to Progressor 8 or 10, but more power than the 8, more damp, smooth; the EDT/Pro models are apparently very stiff and demanding, high speed only.

Elan Speedwave/Waveflex 10 or 12 (last year's) -- similar to above, a bit softer longitudinally, but torsionally stiff for good edge grip; the 10 has no metal; the 12 has metal but is still user-friendly (my brother has the 12, and skis at about your level, and loves them).

Kastle also makes dual radius frontside skis, but I am not familiar enough with their line to advise which would suit you best.  There are others here on the forum who ski Kastle and can help with that.

I am not that familiar with Rossi's groomer skis, so don't know if they have such a design as well.

Hope this helps, and isn't making your choice more confusing.

Later addendum:  I should add that for skiing with young kids (which it sounds like you will doing a lot of), it really helps to get skis that you can ski slowly.  If you end up with skis that only come to life at moderate or high speeds, then you will not like them for dipsy-doodling with the kids.  They will feel like 2x4s.  Skiing with kids can be one of most fun things you can do (I still love it, and our daughters are now teenagers).  So getting a pair of skis for yourself that you can have a blast on while skiing with them, and then wind 'em up and rip some high speed runs on your own or with your wife, and have the skis perform brilliantly there too, is highly recommended.

« Last Edit: November 07, 2011, 07:52:29 am by Svend »

Gary

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2011, 10:05:02 am »
I would agree wholeheartedly with Svend on the Fischer Progressor 8 or it's older version the RX8...

It's a great versatile ski, ice, crud, pow....a ski easy to be with the kids or pushing hard on the blue ice Michigan is famous for. I've owned them, my sons are on them, I've suggested them to many friends who love them.

It's one ski any level 4-8 could appreciate in many types of snow conditions....certa inly a ski you could grow with.

Good luck and thanks for posting...hope to hear more of your on snow experiences..

Best, G

LivingProof

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2011, 11:13:31 am »
Just sayin', but:

Poor is the person who comes to Real Skiers asking about a specific ski and does not leave without a least 6 others to think about!  ::)

Blue Tommie,
The Rossi 70 would serve you very well after reading how you wish to ski. I, too, ski a small hill and think it a waste of good snow not to turn.

jim-ratliff

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2011, 11:27:45 am »
I said it in the Title of This Board.

EVERYONE HAS AN OPINION -- you just have to sort through them.

And I don't think there is anything wrong with that.

I was going to suggest, tongue in cheek, that he try some Ullr's Chariot's but I figured since others had restrained themselves I should show the same maturity.
"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

Gary

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Re: Rossignol Strato 70TI length
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2011, 12:08:24 pm »
I'm just wondering based on the review of that Rossi here (as I have not skied that particular model) if the ski might not be playful enough to jolly around with the kiddies at drift speed!

But regardless....a ski that turns tight and has amazing edge hold sounds like the right tool.