Author Topic: Seagull Century Everyone???  (Read 1340 times)

jim-ratliff

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2011, 05:58:09 pm »

I didn't ride the Aksiums.  I had already decided that their name on my old Fuji would help sell, and that I was quite pleased with my Neuvation wheels and my Conti 4000S tires.  The Neuvations have a slightly more aero profile (probably not noticeable riding) and both have bladed spokes. I did weigh them and the front Mavic was 220 grams heavier and the rear was 120 grams heavier than the Neuvation, so 3/4 of a pound total. 

I didn't check to see how much of that was tire and how much was wheel, but Mavic is like IBM of the 60's and 70's.  No one ever got fired for picking IBM mainframes.

« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 09:48:24 am by jim-ratliff »
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jim-ratliff

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #46 on: October 15, 2011, 05:06:51 pm »
Lynn and I both finished the 100 miles in spite of the brutal winds. Eight hours and fifteen minutes total time, including the 4 rest stops.

Quite pleased we finished- but not sure there is much desire to do another.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2011, 08:30:52 pm by jim-ratliff »
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meput

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #47 on: October 15, 2011, 06:10:43 pm »
Jim & Lynn, congrats on completing your 1st century. Sorry to hear that the winds where brutal. I'll take hills over wind any day. Glad to hear you accomplished your goal. Now that you know you can do it, start planning for your next century. ;D

LivingProof

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #48 on: October 16, 2011, 06:59:39 am »
Jim and Lynn,

Very well done and a tribute to your determination to "get it done".

As I wimped out of the Seagull, I did do 30 miles yesterday, in the same wind, and it was tough going. Can't imagine being out for over 8 hours. At 15 mph average, you need close to 7 hrs of real riding time, so your breaks had to be short. Riding anywhere near a 15 average, in that wind, is something to be proud of. Just curious, but, did you have a very strong rider to pull the group through the wind  via a paceline?

I can understand why you are not tempted to do it again, at least in the near future. One less thing in the "bucket".

Svend

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2011, 07:28:20 am »
Wow! That's quite an accomplishment.  Well done, Lynn and Jim.  I am in awe of your grit and determination to complete that route in tough conditions. 

When you've recovered and rested, do give us more details on the ride. 

Congrats again!


jim-ratliff

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #50 on: October 17, 2011, 09:44:59 pm »
Jim and Lynn,

Very well done and a tribute to your determination to "get it done".

As I wimped out of the Seagull, I did do 30 miles yesterday, in the same wind, and it was tough going. Can't imagine being out for over 8 hours. At 15 mph average, you need close to 7 hrs of real riding time, so your breaks had to be short. Riding anywhere near a 15 average, in that wind, is something to be proud of. Just curious, but, did you have a very strong rider to pull the group through the wind  via a paceline?

I can understand why you are not tempted to do it again, at least in the near future. One less thing in the "bucket".


LP:
Thanks for going riding with us "in spirit".  I don't think I would have gotten out in those winds absent the prior mental commitment. The most impressive part was the sheer numbers of people (I saw bib numbers greater than 9000) at the rest stops, second most impressive was the police support - stopping traffic at every intersection to give the bikers the right of way. But still a larger number of bikes on the ground that I expected (and a couple with ambulances in attendance). And then there were the guys doing 18 against a 20mph headwind 85 miles into the ride. Minimal real pace lines against the wind.  The winds were seldom directly ahead, and the shoulders were narrow so it was impossible to really get in the wind shadow of the person ahead of you.  And the winds were so strong that it didn't feel like you were getting any advantage from being close.  We averaged 18+ on the way out, but that was a couple of unorganized groups and before the wind really began to pick up.


Interestingly, I may be much less intimidated by the winds in the future. You ride 14.5 instead of 18 and just don't fight it.  The lesson/secret for me was never riding at a point where I really felt like my legs were working.

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« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 06:14:30 am by jim-ratliff »
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midwif

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #51 on: October 18, 2011, 08:05:53 am »
Thanks for all the kind comments.

And yes, LP, we felt your spirit with us along the way.

The winds in the first half of the ride were mild in comparison to what followed in the afternoon.
Jim and I tried to play it smart and take it easy the first leg (23 mi). We found a group of 3 guys whose pace was compatible.
They were consistent and smooth. The oldest fellow, John, had recently completed the "America By Bike" riding across the US in 50 days. He was kind enough to let Jim and I draft a bit!.

Other groups we tried to hook with were of varying bike skills. Lots of irregular cadences and understandably, that became more the case as fatigue overtook riders. One amazing father on a tandem with his tweener son just kicked the asses of Lynn and Jim while we tried to draft. We  succeeded in hanging with them, until we realized they were dragging us along at 19-20 mi/hr. Too fast for the second leg of the ride. We let them go. Saw them later at rest stops, I don't think Dad was able to keep that pace up either.

There were 4 rest stops at 23, 44,64 and 84 miles. Bathroom lines were always long and time consuming. The last 2 stops, we headed for a nice spot in the woods instead :D.

I spent about 10 min each rest stop doing a few yoga stretches. Really helped keep my back from "dying". The neck still is the most painful part of biking for me. Okay, sometimes my butt feels painfully numb too. ;D

As mentioned, the wind was pretty brutal the last 1/3 of the ride. Literally pushing the bike sideways. (uh, really should have another set of wheels besides the Zipps, next years upgrade along with new ergo handlebars). Taking even one hand off of the handle bars during some of the gusts would have resulted in loss of control of the bike.

All in all, Jim and I are glad we did it, finished it feeling pretty good too. Not sure I feel the need to do another century ride.
Time will tell. The time investment in training for it is significant.

Let me rephrase that. I am NOT doing another century unless there's a RS posse!! I know a group of us could have SLAYED this ride!! ;D ;) ;D

Lynn
« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 05:03:22 pm by midwif »
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LivingProof

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #52 on: October 18, 2011, 10:05:17 am »
Jim and Lynn,

I remain very impressed with your ride! Just as a point of reference, when I rode on Saturday, started at noon, I did the outbound leg into the wind. At my 14 mile turn around, my average speed was a whopping 12 mph. I was damn glad to get out of the wind. At one point, climbing a bridge, it was all I was riding at at 7 mph to keep from going anaerobic. Just thinking out loud here, but, I wonder if the mental aspect, of riding into major wind and alone, just becomes barricade, as, compared to the "get it done" aspect of a century. The ride with wind at my back was done at speeds around 22 mph. The wind was from the south and I did not have much crosswind.

I'm not in as good condition as 6 weeks ago, on the other hand, I now realize that I was overtrained at summer's end, so the break was a good thing.

So, in spirit, I thought, often. of the two of you both days I rode. Sunday, knowing that you did a ride at a good pace, I just went for it. The wind was still as strong, but, the ride was much easier. But knowing there is only 2 hours of riding makes it easier to get it on.

We will be so well conditioned for the January Elk Demo Day!


jim-ratliff

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #53 on: October 18, 2011, 10:39:25 am »
I think a lot of it is mental. In the wind in the past I've felt like I had to beat the wind; yesterday I was just focused on going where I needed to go at cadence and avoiding my legs feeling like they were working.

Both of our bikes have cassettes with a 32-28-25 big gear set -- that makes it a lot easier for me to go lower speeds and keep a higher cadence.  I'm pretty sure that coming back up and over the Assateague bridge against the wind I was in the 28 (or maybe even the 32), but it was easy pedaling.

Since I don't need 53-11 I also played some to fill in gaps that the wider range created. My cassette is currently a 13-14-15-16-17-19-22-25-28-32. I gave up the 11 for the 32 and gave up the 12 for the 16.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 12:25:18 pm by jim-ratliff »
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LivingProof

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #54 on: October 18, 2011, 05:44:00 pm »
Let me qualify that leg strength and gearing ratio's are not my limiting issue when riding, it's heart rate related. Normally, I use a HR monitor and the issue is just keeping my pulse at a level where I can sustain the riding pace, given the distance I pan to ride. It does not take a lot of wind or increased pace to increase the HR 10 or 15 beats per minute over that which can be sustained for hours.

My 65 year old body is reminding me I'm not a kid anymore. >:(

jim-ratliff

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #55 on: October 18, 2011, 06:54:48 pm »
Me neither.
My limit isn't leg strength so much as the aerobic ability to use the legs. Pushing hard up a hill in a smaller gear at a 75 cadence is much harder on lungs and heart than in a lower gear at an easier 90 .
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bushwacka

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2011, 06:58:59 pm »
Thanks for all the kind comments.

And yes, LP, we felt your spirit with us along the way.

The winds in the first half of the ride were mild in comparison to what followed in the afternoon.
Jim and I tried to play it smart and take it easy the first leg (23 mi). We found a group of 3 guys whose pace was compatible.
They were consistent and smooth. The oldest fellow, John, had recently completed the "America By Bike" riding across the US in 50 days. He was kind enough to let Jim and I draft a bit!.

Other groups we tried to hook with were of varying bike skills. Lots of irregular cadences and understandably, that became more the case as fatigue overtook riders. One amazing father on a tandem with his tweener son just kicked the asses of Lynn and Jim while we tried to draft. We  succeeded in hanging with them, until we realized they were dragging us along at 19-20 mi/hr. Too fast for the second leg of the ride. We let them go. Saw them later at rest stops, I don't think Dad was able to keep that pace up either.

There were 4 rest stops at 23, 44,64 and 84 miles. Bathroom lines were always long and time consuming. The last 2 stops, we headed for a nice spot in the woods instead :D.

I spent about 10 min each rest stop doing a few yoga stretches. Really helped keep my back from "dying". The neck still is the most painful part of biking for me. Okay, sometimes my butt feels painfully numb too. ;D

As mentioned, the wind was pretty brutal the last 1/3 of the ride. Literally pushing the bike sideways. (uh, really should have another set of wheels besides the Zipps, next years upgrade along with new ergo handlebars). Taking even one hand off of the handle bars during some of the gusts would have resulted in loss of control of the bike.

All in all, Jim and I are glad we did it, finished it feeling pretty good too. Not sure I feel the need to do another century ride.
Time will tell. The time investment in training for it is significant.

Let me rephrase that. I am NOT doing another century unless there's a RS posse!! I know a group of us could have SLAYED this ride!! ;D ;) ;D

Lynn
congrats to all of you who did this!!

tandem bikes kill in the wind! and slight downhills! Literally one of the most fun thing I have ever done in a charity event was passing a tandem and its 20 plus train of riders at like mile 90.  The tandem was going sub 6 hours of riding time they were averaging 22-24mph. 

 I tend to ride better in the wind especially when i am working for other people. I actually do fight it and push harder single speed mountian biking has given me enough power to deal with weird/strong wind.

meput

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Re: Seagull Century Everyone???
« Reply #57 on: October 18, 2011, 07:13:41 pm »
Great comments for endurance rides have been made here:

"Interestingly, I may be much less intimidated by the winds in the future. You ride 14.5 instead of 18 and just don't fight it.  The lesson/secret for me was never riding at a point where I really felt like my legs were working."  Yes

"One amazing father on a tandem with his tweener son just kicked the asses of Lynn and Jim while we tried to draft. We  succeeded in hanging with them, until we realized they were dragging us along at 19-20 mi/hr. Too fast for the second leg of the ride" Drafting a tandem is intoxicating. Very easy to get over your own heart rate max redline when on a tandem wheel.

"I think a lot of it is mental. In the wind in the past I've felt like I had to beat the wind; yesterday I was just focused on going where I needed to go at cadence and avoiding my legs feeling like they were working." Great Jim

"it's heart rate related. Normally, I use a HR monitor and the issue is just keeping my pulse at a level where I can sustain the riding pace, given the distance I pan to ride. It does not take a lot of wind or increased pace to increase the HR 10 or 15 beats per minute over that which can be sustained for hours."  Intensive training is not necessary for completing a century, just a reasonable amount of base miles if you carefully moniter your HR max and average; and ride accordingly.

Congrats again Lynn & Jim