Author Topic: cycling season has arrived  (Read 697 times)

meput

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Re: cycling season has arrived
« Reply #45 on: May 02, 2011, 07:08:31 pm »
Got a Hobie Wave since I will be sailing alone most of the time (that is also what was available). Have sailed a Hobie 14 a lot in the past. Some experience on the 16's. The Wave has the reputation of being a good one man boat that can go out in big wind. I like big wind  :-*. Used to drive my wife crazy when I used to windsurf in 20 - 30 mph wind and nobody else on the lake  ;D. So the wave is my concession to the aging process  8).

Jim

jim-ratliff

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Re: cycling season has arrived
« Reply #46 on: May 02, 2011, 07:27:20 pm »
I think I rented a Wave a few years back. Mainsail only, no boom? Nice boat.

The Hobie 16 was a lot by myself. Too much sail for anything more than 12-15 mph winds, but it did fly. My reason for getting rid of it - it just got to be too much getting the mast up by myself (any bets on whether Gary jumps on that line). 14's & 16's were also prone to pitchpole, I think the Wave has a lot more bow?
« Last Edit: May 02, 2011, 08:27:32 pm by jim-ratliff »
"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

meput

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Re: cycling season has arrived
« Reply #47 on: May 02, 2011, 08:11:24 pm »
Wave is a mainsail only design. Work around jib possible. I think most who add the jib are using it to get more sail area when carrying more weight ie passengers.

My understanding is the hull design has less rocker and more width that tends not to submarine when flying the windward hull. Less submarining = less pitchpole.

Supposed to be easy (by single sailor) to right if you manage to tip her over. Has a mast float to make it difficult to turtle.

All of these aspects need confirmation by sailing her, hopefully soon.

BTW, nice hijack of the the original topic  ;).

jim-ratliff

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Re: cycling season has arrived
« Reply #48 on: May 02, 2011, 08:24:11 pm »
And three holes in the clew of the sail to hook the mainsheet for controlling sail shape.  And there was something about the mainsheet traveler that I thought was really nice, but don't remember any more.


OK, I bought a cell phone/GPS carrier for the bike handlebar that works really well.  Its enclosed and padded, so the phone/GPS is protected, and the plastic cover conducts touches through to the phone.  I have an Android (EVO HTC) and the maps function from Google is better than my GPS, especially since most of the local bike trails are on the map and the satellite overlay is sometimes very informative.  Aerodynamically a brick, but sometimes that's OK.   


Lynn and I are planning a trip to the Amish area near Lancaster PA later in the summer and trying to minimize the likelihood of getting dramatically lost in the woods and mud again.  ;D
« Last Edit: May 02, 2011, 08:46:27 pm by jim-ratliff »
"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

meput

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Re: cycling season has arrived
« Reply #49 on: May 02, 2011, 08:43:26 pm »
Don't take a header with your cellphone/GPS on the handlebar and destroy it. May be your only way to contact civilization.  :o

Use my Garmin 305 on my bike for speed, time of ride, distance and heart rate. The iPhone lives in a pocket (playing tunes). I try not to get lost that I need to access maps on the smartphone  :-\.

Nice save on the topic  ;D.