Author Topic: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?  (Read 1198 times)

Ron

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2006, 12:28:02 pm »
OK, where do I start on this?

- throw your body across the fall line, I can never explain the technical aspects very well but I think Gary has it about 90%, When coming out of the turn you basically unweight the uphill foot (unweight not lift) and move your body to the inside of the turn, almost like jumping across the fall line, the weight of you r body will tip you over very quickly, the skis must follow quciklu or your finished!  I don't pick a line in mashed potatoe conditions, jsut keep the ski on edge and rock on. There is no need to absorb the bump or pick a spot to flatten, You can smear it to burn speed but for the mostr part, just keep them rocked on edge.

jim-ratliff

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2006, 01:14:56 pm »
OK, where do I start on this?

- throw your body across the fall line, I can never explain the technical aspects very well but I think Gary has it about 90%, When coming out of the turn you basically unweight the uphill foot (unweight not lift) and move your body to the inside of the turn, almost like jumping across the fall line, the weight of you r body will tip you over very quickly, the skis must follow quickly or your finished!? I don't pick a line in mashed potato conditions, just keep the ski on edge and rock on. There is no need to absorb the bump or pick a spot to flatten, You can smear it to burn speed but for the most part, just keep them rocked on edge.

OK, good explanation.? I assumed that you and Gary weren't that far apart.
 
"unweight the uphill foot" I think you mean the downhill foot, the one that has been on the outside in the turn just completed.? Gary would agree with this, including the part about unweight, not lift.? HH just teaches the lift part as a visual cue, if you have it lifted then you aren't fooling yourself about whether or not you have it unweighted.? The need for that cue goes away quickly.

"the weight of you r body will tip you over very quickly"? I agree with this whole heartedly.? What I am keying on is the "jumping across the fallline" because it envisions an active act (jumping) rather than a passive act (falling).? The push off of the stem christie is an active act, as is the up and down unweighting that you commonly see.

I would have to admit that I have little awareness of when the skis are flat (HH training says I should).? I know that they are flat somewhere in the transition, but if I relax the leg and tip the ski, then for me it is a continuum as my weight falls across the ski.? I don't relax to get flat and then tip to get edged.? In fact, I believe some of the lower level HH books implied that you flattened the skis and allowed them to begin to drift down the hill before tipping into the next turn.? Later progression emphasize tipping to the new edge much higher in the turn with lessened emphasis (I believe, that's the reason I asked JBotti/Gary to jump in) on the float/flat.? I agree that being on edge allows you to slice through slush rather than floating over it (if you skis are stiff enough).? This was one of the real weak points of the iC160's, their tendency to be deflected by a pile of slushy snow even if they were on edge (the other side of that softness, of course, is it allowed them to be more of an all-mountain ski than just a groomer).

Thanks for the expansion of the explanation.
"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

Ron

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #32 on: December 03, 2006, 07:52:26 am »
Yes, thanks, the new uphill ski. I am not good at analyzing my skiing as far as HH and the gang. IT just happens, One thing I can tell you is that to some extent you are jumping acrtoss the fall line, think Gates but the body goes way out and over before the legs come across.

regarding the stiffness of the ski, yes, that's where a stiff ski is a must. If it's a soft ski, then you better pray the ski bites when you lay your body across the fall line because it will be a quick trip!

Regarding where your ski goes flat,  once you come out of the turn and begin to come across the fall line, your skis are at the flattet point. I beleive HH teaches that this is where you let them float and relax. I know that when I cross the fall line its almost a state of falling. That is to say that I don't feel any pressure against the snow, almost like zero gravity for a second. Hard to explain but I think thats what the float is, the ski are moving from one edge to the other and there really is no resistance.  Gary???????

buck

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2006, 08:02:39 am »
So getting back to my original question, on my list of ski's I'm considering. Has anyone tryed these particular models and can make any reccommendations on these models? Thanks.

Gary

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2006, 08:03:54 am »
Well there ya go...we're very close.....for me, it is like falling into the new turn, relaxing, letting it happen, the float naturally occurs between the turns...

Jumping....nope, no jumping for me. It's always the body moving down the mountain ahead of the skis. The skis stay in contact with the snow.

Jumping implies to me compression of the legs and exploding upward to a newly planted ski.

Where for me, it's relaxing the down hill leg, allowing the body to move down the mountain over the tops of the ski (float), transitioning to the new downhill ski. Smooth, silk, effortlessly.

Ron, maybe "jumping" is not the ideal word?

Still, if jumping works.....

7 days till touch down at BC...ya hooooo!

G

Ron

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2006, 09:30:51 am »
yes, you are correct, jumping is not the correct word, I can't describe, so I will show. Its very much the same as skiing gates, its just an exaggerated turn where the transition is very quick and sharp

buck

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Re: I Bought The Stockli's!
« Reply #36 on: December 06, 2006, 08:28:13 am »
I couldn't find any local shops that had a Monster 82 to demo, its hard to find a shop in the midwest that even carries them. I was able to demo the Stockli Stormrider XL again, it skis like a GS race ski on hard pack which I like. I wish I could have tested it in powder or crud, the best I could do was ski under the fresh stuff coming out of the guns. Pretty hard to tell much skiing over five foot mounds of wet snow. I like the way they skied on the hard pack and being 10mm wider than what I normally ski on, they should have the added versatility to handle the soft stuff. The ski was given a Gold Metal by ski magazine in the one quiver ski category, we'll find out!

Ron

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #37 on: December 07, 2006, 07:42:35 am »
Sounds good, please don't quote Ski or Skiing around here ;D

Barrettscv

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #38 on: December 13, 2006, 03:56:25 pm »
I skied the Dynastar Contact 11 today; this needs to be on everyone's list. Report to follow in the review area.

Michael 

RickB

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2006, 08:40:51 pm »
I liked the Contact 11 a lot! Would like to here you thoughts Michael. How have the Aline's worked?

Rick

Barrettscv

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Re: Which All Condition Ski would You Buy?
« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2006, 09:38:26 am »
A review of the 178cm Dynastar Contact 11 is posted in the Dynastar section.