Author Topic: Footbeds and new boots  (Read 404 times)

bf_hill

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Footbeds and new boots
« on: April 18, 2008, 08:05:52 am »
I have a size 9 rigid, high-arched, wedged shaped foot.? I know about the rigid because I had an expert running shoe person fit me for running shoes that knew what they were doing.? I also am a supernator, running on the outsides of my feet.

I love the fit of my current boots Dolomite Free Carves but as the day progresses I need to buckle them up more and the increased fit changes how the skis handle.? They feel like they are oversteering regardless of the ski.?

I was thinking a footbed might be in order first because I can always transfer it to new boots, is that right?? I will have to look around for a place since I am in Florida, not a notorious snow ski venue.? However, the Tampa Bay Snowskiers is one of the largest groups in the nation? ;D

Secondly, rather than try on the myrid number of boots on the market, is there a brand that is typically good for high arches and a relatively wider forefoot and narrower heel?? My skiing level is about 7-8.? My brother says solid 8, but I'm getting older? :'(

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midwif

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2008, 08:45:16 am »
Good morning Brad

A good first place to start is to read the boot section here on RealSkiers, which I believe refers you to Harald Harbs site for info specific on what kind of boot characteristics to look for (lateral boots being the way to go, avoid rotary designed boots).

As far as footbeds, do NOT do the solid/cork footbeds. You may know this already, especially as a higher level skier, but you need to be able to use the muscle of your foot in the boot.

As far as finding a good boot /footbed  fitter in Florida??? You're on your own!!! Planning any visits close to where skiing actually takes place in the near future??
Ron is very happy with his last fitting.( New Jersey?)
 I wait to go to Colorado and stop by Harbs place for any tweaking (and I have had a LOT of Boot tweaking as my fellow RS friends know) due to a narrow foot, skinny ankle, flat foot, pronating scenario. The original footbeds made by HH &Co 4 years ago are still doing fine.
"Play it Sam"

bf_hill

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2008, 09:03:00 am »
Hi Midwif,

Thanks, I started reading the boot section a bit, enough to wonder about the footbed transferrabilty issue.  I remember the lateral vs rotary issue.   I'll read some more. 

jim-ratliff

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2008, 09:24:24 am »
I'll toss in the America's Best Bootfitters web site.? I too trust Harald Harb for boot fitting and footbed (and they do a footbed analysis for everyone at their ski camps) more than most of these, but they are better than the run of the mill ski shop.

And, they may actually be better as far as pointing you toward boots that are a good match for your feet.  However, they won't buy into the whole rotary discussion/concept.

http://www.bootfitters.com/

"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

bf_hill

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2008, 10:03:17 am »
Thanks Jim, can you elaborate on this :
Quote
However, they won't buy into the whole rotary discussion/concept.

jim-ratliff

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2008, 10:41:22 am »
Thanks Jim, can you elaborate on this :
Quote
However, they won't buy into the whole rotary discussion/concept.


Yeah, I could, but you have been mean and disrespectful to me so I ain't going to.? ?;D

In my words/summary.? keep that in mind.? I'm sometimes not real precise.

Look at the first message link below and Gary has another post right next to it.? Most bootfitters see everything as a canting or alignment problem.? They will have you stand in the boots and check to see if the center of mass of your knee aligns perfectly over the gap between your big and second toe.? Mine does.? Then they will have you flex your knees and measure again.? if you are now out of alignment, then they will cant the soles of the boots to get that alignment back.? Harald says that this isn't an alingment problem, its a problem with the boots not tracking straight forward when flexed.? The boot manufacturers say this is to enhance the "turning power" of the boots, Harald says that turning power is counter-productive because you are trying to edge the skis and not turn them; it makes it more difficult to apply even edging pressure to the ski and that boots should track straight forward when flexed.? Boots that track to the inside he calls rotary, boots that track straight forward are called lateral.? In his books, Harald lists a number of boot manufacturers that make non-rotary boots.? My guess/personal opinion is that you can determine whether a boot is rotary just by watching what the bootfitter sees when he checks alignment.

At the very least, try a pair of Head or Dalbello boots and see what your alignment is when standing and when flexed, and compare that to what happens with a pair of Atomics or Lange's.? I predict the results will differ.? My concern is that if the boot changes my alignment, then how do I stay balanced when I am somewhere between straight up and fully flexed.? Flexing or bending the boots should change my fore-aft balance, it shouldn't affect my sideway balance.

http://skiforums.org/rev2/index.php?topic=1268.msg5197#msg5197

I've actually had a couple of places do a boot alignment, either for real because of a purchase or as part of considering a purchase.? Harb's people were the only ones that noticed that although my alignment was good, I have a "forefoot varus" that makes it difficult to get pressure to the big toe (especially when the ankle is pretty locked in neutral in a ski boot and can't compensate by rolling over), and their modification to my footbeds several years back made a huge difference.

http://www.comfortshoe.com/knee_pain.html


« Last Edit: April 18, 2008, 09:13:58 pm by jim-ratliff »
"If you're gonna play the game boy, ya gotta learn to play it right."

bf_hill

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2008, 11:07:28 am »
Wow.  Well dang, doesn't that make sense.  And with the enhanced turning "power" of the shaped skis do we really need extra boot turning.  I would think also that if you hit a mogul your flex is going to be more than a regular turn so you would have to learn some sort of compensatory strategy for different flexing turns.

Just guessing here.


Thanks for the elaboration!  Quite interesting. 

bf_hill

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Re: Footbeds and new boots
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2008, 01:23:50 pm »
Yeah, I could, but you have been mean and disrespectful to me so I ain't going to.? ?;D

Dearest Jim, I am greviously wounded. :'(? I have nothing but the utmost respect and admiration for you.? I even offered to increase the size of my font for your aging eyes!? When Midwif turned against you and wanted to throw you off the mountain for misuse of moderator powers I stood up and said "Let he who is without dark chocolate Reese's peanut butter cups give him the first push, but gently!"

Signed,
Falsely Accused in Florida





Quote from: jim-ratliff
Blatant obfuscation, in my humble opinion.   ;D ;)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2008, 09:10:56 pm by jim-ratliff »