realskiers

Other Stuff => Biking and other Non-Skiing Activities => Topic started by: Perry on March 30, 2011, 11:17:26 am


Title: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Perry on March 30, 2011, 11:17:26 am
I have been absent, mostly due to the denial of my season ending prior to most of the rest of you.  Didn't want to be reminded of what I was missing.  I had a good year and re - energized my wife's passion for skiing and her hope in getting better ( thanks again Gary ) So it was a great year even though it seemed short.

I am thankful that I am excited by my cycling season.  I discovered this last year and am quite surprised at how much I enjoy cycling.  Starting to feel the "snap" coming back in my legs.  I hope to do my first century ride this year.  Last year I did my first metric century.

So what are others looking forward to with their biking this year.

Sorry if this post brings on the finality that this years skiing is almost over for the rest of you -- welcome to my world  >:(
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on March 30, 2011, 12:21:52 pm
Perry:

Glad you hear you have picked up cycling.? I just started riding 2 years ago, so this will be my third summer.? I too did a metric century that first full year (I think I got my bike late summer the year before, too senile to remember for sure). I never felt the need to train for a full century, but did accumulate over 1300 miles last summer (I hesitate to ask JBotti how many miles he rode).

This summer, Lynn and I have added mountain bikes, and I have 130 miles or so on my mountain bike so far from a month ago when it turned warmer for a while.?

There are an amazing number of Fairfax County Trails that follow the streambeds that is zoned as park land because its in the flood plain.? Trails range all the way from asphalt paved to ruttted single track with lots of tree roots (I almost lost my keys last ride because I bounced them out of my under seat bag that I had accidentally left unzipped). Had to backtrack about a mile but DID find them laying along the edge of the trail.

There is also a trail on the C&O Canal towpath.? The C&O Canal was built by George Washington to bypass Great Falls on the Potomac, and it runs a long ways upriver from Georgetown. And Lynn's "country estate" is in the hills of New York along the Delaware River, so lots of off-piste trails there.

Should we have a Cycling section on the modified Realskiers forum? (see the "2011 Coming Changes" Board.)

BTW, maybe not in this forum, but what is your end of season assessment of the Watea's?
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Gary on March 30, 2011, 12:55:45 pm
WOW you guys are amazing....gesh...I look at my road bike hanging in the garage everynight I come home from work....

It's a reminder of adventures to come but my ski poles, ski clothes and boot bag dominate the house for at least another month.

Still I admire the miles you guys put in and the sites you must see. We are heading to New Orleans to catch a conference my daughter is speaking at in about 10 days. We will do a bike tour of the French Quarter finding every good place we could stop and eat at....nice!

In May with friends we're going to bike in Southern Italy on the east coast and I"m really looking forward to that...

BUT metric century in this century, would be a hectic century for me...hats off to you Perry. It's a real testiment to your endurance and buns of steel. AND Jim 130 miles of mountain biking...protect those family jewels my friend AT ALL COST!
Now...I must think skiing skiing skiing....at least for a few more weeks ...then it's golfing golfing golfing and some biking eating biking eating....ah summer...wonderful!? ;D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Perry on March 30, 2011, 03:23:58 pm
Jim - I feel pretty good about my Watea 98.  For my first wider ski, the fun factor was more than I expected.  Helped my off-piste skiing immensely.  Without skiing others to compare, hard to know just how "perfect" they are.  I was intimidated to go 186 and now wonder why.  So that is the benefit of trying something new.

The mountain bike sound really fun.  I am trying not to think about it due to the extra $$$. 

Yes - there should be a cycling section.  BTW - I haven't found many cycling forums that I like, just curious if others found something like this or EPIC but in the cycling world.

Gary - this is my only way to "get over" the end of my ski season.  I wish I had an April trip planned to the Rockies (perhaps Canadian  ;D).  Just not in the cards.  I gave Gloria a really nice 25th diamond ring with major BLING.  That would have covered several trips and a summer excursion to Chile.  I have no regrets which tells you a lot about my wife!! She is awesome.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on March 30, 2011, 04:10:00 pm

www.mtbr.com (http://www.mtbr.com) has quite a bit of information and reviews of various gear.

www.bikeforum.net (http://www.bikeforum.net) is another.

I've read www.slowtwitch.com  (http://www.slowtwitch.com) some even though it is a Triathlon/athlete site.

John Botti is an avid biker / racer, perhaps he'll chime in.

Perry, not sure whether this is of interest to you or not, but I replaced the cassette on my road bike with an 11-32 cassette and a mid-cage Ultegra derailleur and love it.  Gives me a lot more ability to climb hills in my advanced state of age and/or reduced state of ability.  Real bike riders may not need it, but it sure helped me.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: LivingProof on March 30, 2011, 04:51:08 pm
In prep for the Epic gathering, I've been out riding for the past month on a paved path alongside a small stream in Philly. It's 17 miles with some climbing, been using my 20 year old Trek cross-trainer. It's a very pretty, tranquil route, although I did find myself in the middle of a running deer herd that happened to cross the path. No cars, no stop signs, no cross traffic. Some horse droppings, but, a little b.s. is just part of life. The path is sheltered from the wind, always a good thing. As a boy, I played in there and it goes right by my high school. Nostalgic.

While the Pa ski areas were open, I would ski one day and ride the next. I think the aerobic part has me as ready for Summit Co. as I can be. Have not been in that altitude for 4 years, so we will see, glad I'm sleeping in Dillon because it's lower. Biking is not as good exercise for the thighs or so my recent skiing trips tell me.

Biking appeals to the introvert in me ,as it just clears my head, and gives me time to muse about all the things going on. Conversations with self can be a good thing. Biking tired is a good tired and I sleep well.

Going to checkout a Craigslist Mtn. bike Saturday. The quiver just may be expanded.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: ToddW on March 30, 2011, 04:59:56 pm
Jim,

A cycling section sounds like a good idea.  At the AlpineZone skiing forum for East Coasters, there's a fair amount of off-season discussion of biking.  Check out http://forums.alpinezone.com

They make a big production of switching the order of the forums and the background color from winter to summer and back.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Perry on March 30, 2011, 05:46:14 pm
I like the copyright background we have  >:D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: midwif on March 30, 2011, 08:28:47 pm

While the Pa ski areas were open, I would ski one day and ride the next. I think the aerobic part has me as ready for Summit Co. as I can be. Have not been in that altitude for 4 years, so we will see, glad I'm sleeping in Dillon because it's lower. Biking is not as good exercise for the thighs or so my recent skiing trips tell me.

Going to checkout a Craigslist Mtn. bike Saturday. The quiver just may be expanded.


Hope I'm not bursting your bubble here, but Dillon is still over 9,000 feet.
Bring the ambien!
Lynn
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on March 30, 2011, 08:39:48 pm
I am glad I am up in Maine where we are still skiing. Northeaster storm warning for Friday. The 'loaf is forecasted to get ~ 12 inches snow.

For the last 3 winters that I have been skiing, I have had a hard time justifying biking when I can still be skiing. This is coming from a biker who used to bike 12 months a year (in Maine) before I started skiing again. One of my summer bike clubs had a group ride on March 13th, didn't make it, I was skiing.

Only sad thing about skiing and biking: biking helps your skiing, skiing does not help your biking ?:(!!
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on March 30, 2011, 08:51:59 pm
I am also excited for cycling season!! We hit 86 F today in Southern Marin Cty Ca. It was a gorgeous day for a ride and i did one with my wife that was spectacular!! I have some different goals this year with my cycling than in past years. I may have done my last race in October last year. Usually at this point I am humping it hard to get into race shape but in looking back at all the years of hard training, making sure my upper body atrophes and losing 5-7 lbs from my natural weight, I think I am finally older and wiser. This year I want to enjoy all my rides and do a few centuries and other fun rides where there is no stop watch. I am also pretty committed to not riding 6 days a week which has been the norm for me for years. 4 rides per week just sounds so much more civilized!!

Hoping everyone has a great season and some truly wonderful and breathtaking rides!!
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Gary on April 01, 2011, 09:33:17 am
Ok Perry...so you've got the rest of this year to save up for next years skiing trips..

Conrgrats on your 25th....and she is a great lady for sure! Nice get on the bling!

It was a blast skiing with you guys and watching you rip on the Wateas was fantastic. To see Gloria going into new terrain as well was outstanding.

So cycle away and don't make it to long before we ski with you all again!

G
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: gandalf on April 04, 2011, 07:50:33 am

John:

And I hope you and your wife share several more "spectacular" rides this summer.  :)

Are you going to miss that sense of competition though.  Sometimes hard to give up?

We are supposed to hit 80 today, but then back to the 50's and rainy.  I guess there are some advantages to California (at least when the ground isn't shaking.

Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 04, 2011, 07:54:52 am
I have been absent, mostly due to the denial of my season ending prior to most of the rest of you.? Didn't want to be reminded of what I was missing.? I had a good year and re - energized my wife's passion for skiing and her hope in getting better ( thanks again Gary ) So it was a great year even though it seemed short.

I am thankful that I am excited by my cycling season.? I discovered this last year and am quite surprised at how much I enjoy cycling.? Starting to feel the "snap" coming back in my legs.? I hope to do my first century ride this year.? Last year I did my first metric century.

So what are others looking forward to with their biking this year.

Sorry if this post brings on the finality that this years skiing is almost over for the rest of you -- welcome to my world? >:(

Perry:  Since I a little bit of a gear ****, tell me a bit about your bike. Model, components, did you replace wheels?
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on April 04, 2011, 09:01:57 am
Jim, perhaps I will miss the competition some. Mainly over the past several years I have competed more because I wanted a reason to train hard. After seeing and feeling how my body reacts to more strength training and less aerobic intensity, I don't think I want a reason to train real hard anymore. I think if I miss anything it will be some of the great training rides and I will most likley put some of those in, but only when my body feels like it, wants it and can handle it. I have had way too many days where I was tired and where I pushed myself well beyond what felt good because I needed (or I thought I needed) a "quality workout" that day.

Had another spectacular ride with the wife on Saturday when we rode Trinity Road (10% average grade for 3 miles, so not that long but steep with parts close to 15%) in Sonoma. Relative to our respective abilities she is in better shpae that I am at this point in the seaosn. If this keeps up we will be doing many great rides together this season.

But... I still have some skiing left to do!! Back in MT this friday and the conditions still look great with a lot more snow expected. Happy to miss some cycling for this!!
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 04, 2011, 10:38:59 am
Had another spectacular ride with the wife on Saturday when we rode Trinity Road (10% average grade for 3 miles, so not that long but steep with parts close to 15%) in Sonoma. Relative to our respective abilities she is in better shpae that I am at this point in the seaosn. If this keeps up we will

Ok, that's just humbling!!  3 miles at 10-15% grade and you call it a spectacular ride.   ;D  Maybe if going down the hill!!

I guess, as Lynn always says, its all about specificity of training. 
You ride what is in your area (but I couldn't ride what is in your area or in the Rockies).
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: midwif on April 04, 2011, 06:16:43 pm
It snowed friday at my upper ny state locale.
And given meput's plans to ski "the Loaf" this weekend due to the
gift this nor'easter was supposed to bring, I was almost tempted to chase some snow.

Then I remembered my credit card bill. It's been a great ski season. Now its time to settle up.

Oh, and time to try out that BRAND SPANKING NEW MOUTAIN BIKE I got sitting in the garage!!
As the 2 inches of wet, slushy stuff melt off my deck and yard, Jim and I  decided to do a first test ride with my new
wheels.

We did 5 miles. Some firm dirt trail, some mud, puddles, some softening icy/snowy spots in the shade.
WHAT A LOT OF FUN!

I am looking forward to a real ride. With appropriate foot wear. (forgot the biking shoes, so not cleated in).

There are a fair number of dirt roads in my neck of the woods to explore on our bikes. And a 30 mile single track in Pa we have our eyes on.

What bike you ask? What components?? Gee, I just ride the thing. Jim picked it out. Carbon with slx components is all I know. Disc brakes. Shocks??
Hmm, can't remember :D
Jim can fill you in. :-[
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on April 04, 2011, 08:16:36 pm
Jim, it is a very different experience with a compact chain ring and an 11-28 on the back. It also (as you mention) has a lot to do with getting used to riding lots of hills. We have nothing but hills out here and because it never snows the grade tends to be on the steeper side. In six months of living here you would be comfortable on most of the hills (again with the right chain rings and cassettes).

Glad to see you and Lynn are getting out and enjoying your bikes. For me it is almost as good as skiing.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 04, 2011, 08:29:40 pm
John:

I do have a compact crank and a 12-32 cassette based on a SRAM cassette except that I replaced some of the lower gears with different/lighter Shimano cogs (closer gearing in the middle where I currently ride the most).

The truth is that I just started riding two years ago and am still getting into shape. I also never knew about slow twitch vs fast twitch muscle fibers, but I was a basketball and baseball player in high school so I was basically fast twitch fibre person the first 60 years of my life.? >:( ;D and that's the story I'm sticking to.

But it is still impressive to hear about others rides.

Lynn, on the other hand, run's an 11-25 cassette and non-compact crank and does just fine.? Have to admire the aerobic base of former triathloners.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 04, 2011, 08:47:39 pm
Lynn:

I am impressed that you remembered that the components were SLX,
And that that is one step up from my XT components.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on April 04, 2011, 10:26:56 pm
Well those of us that have been doing endurance athletics (running and cycling etc) for many yeras wish we had some fast twitch fiber left in our bodies!! Unfortunatley in my 30 yeras of endurance training I have pretty much lost all the fast twitch that may have ever existed and I was not starting with tons. Some form of balance between Aerobic, Anaerobic and flexibility is the key especially as we all get older. You probably need to cycle more and I need to do more strength training and we all need to keep up our flexibility.

Some amount of the training process in cycling and endurance sports is psychological. There is no substitute for knowing that you can run for 2 hours or cycle for 6 or climb for 20 miles staright because you have done it before and you know how to get to the end. But all of this will come my friend!!! Enjoy and take it at your own pace.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 05, 2011, 06:48:15 am
The main thing for me is that cycling is FUN, it doesn't feel like "working out"and that is important. And it is like skiing in the outdoors beauty respect. I must have seen 20 deer on a quick after work ride yesterday, some pretty close up.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 05, 2011, 06:47:24 pm
Jim,

Don't do a Matt Lauer and hit one of those deer :D.

Weather looks good for . . . . . skiing next weekend (isn't that what this forum is about?)  :o

Have fun on the bike.

Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 05, 2011, 07:32:49 pm
Jim:

Wellll, the site does have the word ski in the title, but mostly it's just about whatever anyone feels like talking about.
In fact, prior to the Ski Logik thread the largest thread was about coffee and espresso machines.

 But l will admit that I'm a bit jealous of the fact that your season continues. I'm like Perry, making the spring switch. The high here yesterday was 80.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: Perry on April 19, 2011, 04:12:29 pm
My miles are increasing, now just over 80 per week with 65 the last two weekend.  Having some fun while I sweat!  Which reminds me of another thing I like but we won't go there!! >:D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 19, 2011, 08:53:28 pm
Live on a lake in central Maine. Ice went out today, so spring is coming.

The 'loaf has mid winter coverage with spring conditions. No bare spots yet. Winter weather advisory for several inches of snow over the next 24 hours. The bike continues to gather dust. >:D.

Using both my SS's and monster 78's. Cold enough last Saturday that I used the SS's all day. Having to put in mental energy on which skis to use? ::).

Still putting off the mental energy of compact chain rings vs 53/39 set up....what cluster to use?....clincher vs the tubulars....toe covers vs boots....vest vs jacket.... water vs cytomax....what route has the least amount of sand on the road?..........

Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 19, 2011, 09:06:23 pm
Upstate New York, the snow is mostly gone, but the trails are still pretty muddy in some places.?

#2 -- Lynn thought she could pedal through this muddy section.? She didn't quite make it.? Note the muddy shoes (from the knee down).? Not from this fall, there was a MUCH muddier section earlier. (FWIW, I was really impressed how well the Candy cleats and pedals worked in that much mud).

However, let there be no doubt, while we are collecting a few bruises here and there (and we won't go there as to where), we are having a blast exploring places that road bikes won't go.


[attachment removed after 60 days]
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 20, 2011, 07:06:06 am
Live on a lake in central Maine. Ice went out today, so spring is coming.

The 'loaf has mid winter coverage with spring conditions. No bare spots yet. Winter weather advisory for several inches of snow over the next 24 hours. The bike continues to gather dust. >:D.

Using both my SS's and monster 78's. Cold enough last Saturday that I used the SS's all day. Having to put in mental energy on which skis to use? ::).

Still putting off the mental energy of compact chain rings vs 53/39 set up....what cluster to use?....clincher vs the tubulars....toe covers vs boots....vest vs jacket.... water vs cytomax....what route has the least amount of sand on the road?..........

Maybe I need to consider a trip to 'the Loaf' next year.? Would feel weird to have the ski season end, and then be able to go up there a month later and ski. Maybe we should consider a "the season is over - NOT" Realskiers trip to Maine next spring.? Highs here in the nation's capitol 80+ today.

I use a compact chainring and a 12-32 cassette on my road bike.? I have a Gore jacket with removable sleeves to address the vest vs. jacket question.? And, for me, water and GuJel.? For wheels, Neuvation (or Zipp 404's in Lynn's case) clinchers and Continental 4000S tires.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: LivingProof on April 20, 2011, 09:38:33 am
Upstate New York, the snow is mostly gone, but the trails are still pretty muddy in some places.?

#2 -- Lynn thought she could pedal through this muddy section.? She didn't quite make it.? Note the muddy shoes (from the knee down).? Not from this fall, there was a muddier section earlier.

However, let there be no doubt, we are collecting a few bruises but having a blast learning to mountain bike.



OMG, the pic of Lynn standing in mud just destroyed my image of our urban New Yorker. There is a street rumor that Lynn consented to MTN biking because it was an opportunity to shop for a new pair of shoes! (Mike ducking)

Who cleans the bikes? Cleaning my cross-trainer is not a favorite chore and it's never been as dirty as Lynn's nice, new, formerly shinny bike. I showed a pic to my wife and asked if she would be willing to try MTN biking. Her answer is "Hell will freeze over....".

Keep the pics coming and good for ya that you are out there doing it in the mud. Jim, don't run into her!


@meput
Jim,
I assume you ride a traditional road bike? Do you use larger tires? We in more urban areas complain about our roads, but, I'm sure Maine rural roads can be bone jarring. Had I my choice, I'd be at the 'loaf rather than putting in miles. Last weekend, riding in northeast winds, steady at 20 with gusts to 30, reminded me of how much fun it is (not) to put your nose into the wind and make 10 mph.

Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 20, 2011, 12:13:20 pm
LP:? But the return bike trip at a sustained 30mph must have been a blast??? Like working your way upwind on a sailboat, the? reward is the tacking downwind (Hobie 16) on the way back.

The rumor on the street regarding Lynn and shoes is true.? Narrow Sidi's in a coordinated color it is.

Lynn wanted to take the Power Washer to them.? I told her I was afraid that might do more damage to paint and bearings than the mud.? So we decided to leave them muddy and look the look.
Actually, I hurriedly rinsed them off with a hose at the time - but was on my way to a week in Boston and wound up washing my bike in the bathtub at the hotel.? Hers????? ?>:D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 20, 2011, 03:06:34 pm
My miles are increasing, now just over 80 per week with 65 the last two weekend.? Having some fun while I sweat!? Which reminds me of another thing I like but we won't go there!! >:D

Hey Perry, post a pic of you and your bike getting ready to hit the road.? 65 miles per weekend is pretty impressive. I certainly hope and assume that a helmet is part of the picture?
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 20, 2011, 05:48:35 pm
Jim,
Anytime "Realskiers" skiers want to make the trip to the 'loaf, just let me know. Happy to be host and guide.

LP,
I am shocked. You imply that Maine does not have good roads? :o. Actually, how did you know that Maine roads suck? :'(? Yes, I am a roadie. But even with lousy roads, I do not make any concession to pot holes, heaves and **** roads with wider tires. I am a throw back to older times and ride most of the time on tubulars - 22mm. General wheels are Bontrager aluminum Race X tubies with Conti Sprints. Good wheels are Bontrager XXX with Veloflex Carbons. Have not used my clinchers in about 3-4 years and they were all 23mm. Primary bike is an '05 S-works Roubaix. Have been considering a newer model that is supposed to have better "vertical compliance" i.e. softer ride for the "rough" roads. That would be nice for these old bones? 8).

You bring up one of my bike issues. I will take hills any day over wind. Hills come to an end. Wind does not. Here in Maine, winds usually shift so that most of my windy rides, I am fighting head winds the entire ride. It is a rare day that I fight a head wind going out, then have the "wonderful" tail wind coming back. In Maine, it is not uncommon to be going downhill, a significant head wind such that your heart rate is red lining while you are going 10 mph. Such is life. No wonder I am still skiing? ;D.

Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on April 21, 2011, 08:57:46 pm
Meput, don't come to the SF bay area to cycle. All we have is large amounts of wind and hills!! I do think it is human nature to push hard against the wind. In relality it is about the same as climbing hills (although mentally more trying). You need to pick a power level that you can maintain and just stay there and accept that pace. The wind is just as powerful as a hill and no cyclist can overpower the wind (at least not for very long). And of course flying downwind can be a lot of fun, almost like skiing!!
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: LivingProof on April 22, 2011, 11:17:56 am
Jim,
Anytime "Realskiers" skiers want to make the trip to the 'loaf, just let me know. Happy to be host and guide.

LP,
I am shocked. You imply that Maine does not have good roads? :o. Actually, how did you know that Maine roads suck? :'(? Yes, I am a roadie. But even with lousy roads, I do not make any concession to pot holes, heaves and **** roads with wider tires. I am a throw back to older times and ride most of the time on tubulars - 22mm. General wheels are Bontrager aluminum Race X tubies with Conti Sprints. Good wheels are Bontrager XXX with Veloflex Carbons. Have not used my clinchers in about 3-4 years and they were all 23mm. Primary bike is an '05 S-works Roubaix. Have been considering a newer model that is supposed to have better "vertical compliance" i.e. softer ride for the "rough" roads. That would be nice for these old bones? 8).

You bring up one of my bike issues. I will take hills any day over wind. Hills come to an end. Wind does not. Here in Maine, winds usually shift so that most of my windy rides, I am fighting head winds the entire ride. It is a rare day that I fight a head wind going out, then have the "wonderful" tail wind coming back. In Maine, it is not uncommon to be going downhill, a significant head wind such that your heart rate is red lining while you are going 10 mph. Such is life. No wonder I am still skiing? ;D.

Jim


meput,

The only reason I know Maine roads suck is that 99.999 of all roads suck, and, few states have Maine winters. My only visit to Maine was a business trip to lobby the Public Utility Commission to make a contract award to a consulting firm to perform an analysis of the under-performing electric reliability in the state. Had we won, I would have spent a summer there and toured extensively. For some reason, I don't think I need to do that level assessment to predict your typical road surface.

Having said the above,

I stand in awe of anyone who rides 22 mm tubular tires on rough roads. Your hands, wrists, elbows, et al, have my best wishes for long life. They don't breed your type here in Pennsylvania.

And here's to all who turn and pedal into headwinds.....damn few of us left! But when we go skiing, we bring a great aerobic system with us. I was so pleased in Summit Co. a couple of weeks ago, with respect to how well I could breath, both on and off the slopes. Not saying I did not have acclimation difficulty, but, my wind did not suck (so bad).
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 22, 2011, 07:20:50 pm
JB,
I hate to disagree about hills and wind. Give me a hill any day. Some days I think I am mentally afflicted when I seek out hills. I think I am even sicker when I seek out the steeper grades that will be into a head wind (the method to my madness is that the longer shallower downhill grades will be with the wind? :P). Wind in Maine is so gusty that as you settle into that nice pace, then the gust/wind builds, your peddle pressure slowly builds to maintain your cadence and next thing you are in over your head, anaerobic and in trouble. Mentally you realize you need to downshift and but you just do not want to because the grade has not changed. Wind can be very demoralizing.
I will take a nice ski run over a long downhill, with the wind, bike run any day. The joy of ski turns to control speed vs squeezing a brake makes it a no contest. Furthermore, since I am a downhill skier, not a ski tourer, I get to enjoy riding a lift back up to hill to just go down again. On my bike, it is climb the hill to enjoy the downhill run again (which I do many times when I do hill intervals because I am afflicted mentally? ::)). Will take skiing any day over biking. ;D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 22, 2011, 07:43:39 pm
Mike,
I ride the tubulars to save my body. A tubular has a lot more compliance and therefore a softer ride on bad road surfaces than do clinchers. As my riding season progresses (usually about 1000 miles) I shift to the? carbon wheels with the tubies. It is about that point that I start doing the longer (60+ mile rides). I am not a racer, therefore my good wheels are my everyday ride. I ride for fun (not withstanding my rant on wind to JB) therefore I use my good wheels once I have my base miles in.

Yes, cycling does help your skiing, unfortunately skiing does not help your cycling.
Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jbotti on April 22, 2011, 10:28:32 pm
In Maine you are most likley not cycling in the winter. I cycle the whole winter in CA and I will say that the skiiing does help hold some of the conditioning. It's possible that this is nothing more than acclimating to altitude (our home in MT is at 8900 feet) for 7-14 days at a time. When I come back from 10 days or so at altitude, it often feels like I have not been off the bike.

I am pretty used to lots of wind, but I would agree and I also prefer hills. I love riding hills and I don't love wind, but I probably don't hate it to the degree that you do.

Here I just wish we had more sunny warm days on the bike. There are too many days in the middle of summer where the temps never get above 60 and the fog on MT Tam may not lift until 1-2 in the afternoon. Having said that, there really is nothing like a great bike rdie (when you can't ski!!).
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on April 23, 2011, 11:21:35 am
Having said that, there really is nothing like a great bike rdie (when you can't ski!!).

You got me. I have to agree.

Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 25, 2011, 07:23:10 am
Having said that, there really is nothing like a great bike rdie (when you can't ski!!).

You got me. I have to agree.

Jim

I have to agree as well.? I used to avoid really windy days.? Now I just do the mountain bike instead and stay on the local trails sheltered by the trees.? I did a ride in 30 mph winds with gusts to 45 and wasn't affected until the way back (and I had set that to be downwind).? Could ride downwind at 15 mph without pedaling.
But I'm such a rookie -- half the time when I think I'm riding into a headwind I eventually realize that it's just the apparent wind that I'm creating.

Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 25, 2011, 07:38:58 am
LP:? You had asked who washes the bikes??? ??? ? I guess the answer is "I volunteered", but took this picture first.
We had a REALLY muddy ride two weeks ago, Lynn's bike (the red one) was still showing the effects.

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Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: LivingProof on April 25, 2011, 09:36:27 am
Lynn and Jim,

Nice bikes....a quiet purchase not shared with the RS team...

GT full suspension, getting ready to ride with Ron? What are your thougths about full suspension and how it's worked on the trails you have ridden.

Memory recalls that a short year ago, you biked along the Youghiogheny, but, were downplaying Mtn bikes. Times have changed. ::)

Why are Lynn's tires still muddy while Jim's are clean?
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on April 25, 2011, 10:02:05 am
Lynn and Jim,

Nice bikes....a quiet purchase not shared with the RS team...

GT full suspension, getting ready to ride with Ron? What are your thougths about full suspension and how it's worked on the trails you have ridden.

Memory recalls that a short year ago, you biked along the Youghiogheny, but, were downplaying Mtn bikes. Times have changed. ::)

Why are Lynn's tires still muddy while Jim's are clean?

Last year I was looking for way to broaden the range of my road bike with wider tires.? We came to the conclusion that it was futile. Just not enough clearance. Lynn's GT titanium bike won't even accept 700x25c tires on the back (and I think you said the same thing about yours). The Youghiogheny trip was what we wanted to be able to ride, but showed all the things bad about mountain bikes. VERY heavy (maybe 35 pounds) and no shock control. Wal-Mart mountain bikes.

Lot of help from Svend sharing his knowledge and experience with mountain biking with us.
Choices were 26" hardtail, 29" hardtail, 26" full suspension.
29" hardtail's ride smoother than 26", (but didn't fit in the back of my RAV4 and felt big), but you still need to absorb a much of the bikes motion with your legs and be out of the saddle.

Full suspension is more plush, but can be MUCH heavier, and you can lose a lot of energy to pedal bob if you are out of the saddle or pedaling hard.
The Youghiogheny bikes we rented exhibited both of these problems.
We decided on the full suspension because we wanted a bit more comfort for longer rides.
We decided on carbon frames to get the weight down to the 24 lb range, at the expense of higher end components (easier to upgrade components later if we want). GT seems to have a good mid-range reputation and their rear linkage seems well reviewed. Not an IBIS or a Specialized Stump Jumper, but a good compromise for what we really ride.
Front and rear shocks have lots of adjustments (11 different variations of rebound quickness), complete lockout for smooth surfaces. and we decided on cross country shocks (120 mm travel) rather than more down hill, 150mm travel shocks.

I am very pleased with the way they ride and what they weigh. My road bike is 17 pounds, so 24 isn't that much heavier, especially when you figure that the tires are probably 4 pounds extra all by themselves.
Riding country roads that are a mix of gravel, rock, ruts and exposed subsurface big rocks is amazingly smooth. Many of the trails here in Virginia are asphalt that have big heaves in them from tree roots, or dirt packed trails with series of tree roots. You still feel them, but the tires stay connected to the trail rather than getting bounced all around going up hill, and just letting the bike run downhill is even smoother.

Ohhhh!!! And disk brakes and that 22 tooth front chainring are wonderful.

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Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: midwif on April 25, 2011, 10:43:32 am
Lynn and Jim,

Nice bikes....a quiet purchase not shared with the RS team...

Memory recalls that a short year ago, you biked along the Youghiogheny, but, were downplaying Mtn bikes. Times have changed. ::)

Why are Lynn's tires still muddy while Jim's are clean?

To elaborate further;

There was lots of discussion about it and research. Well, Jim did most of the research. My contribution was to say I think we needed to upgrade to Carbon Fiber if the price difference was not astronomical. AND JIM WORKED the Performance Bike holiday sales like a master craftsman!!

I still can't quite take in how we got such incredible deals using their system.

The day of our "lost" trek in Boy Scout territory, mud and all, left no time for me to clean my bike before heading to work that night.

Jim headed to Boston for a week, where the bath tub at the hotel accommodated his dirty bike.
My bathtub refuses to allow clay dirt in its environ. ;)

Even a couple of rides in central park did not dislodge that stuff!

It is possible I like mountain biking better than road biking. I hate sharing the road with cars. >:D

And we have pretty much figured out that we can ride directly from my place upstate to vast acres of trails with minimal black top involved. Lots to explore! ;D

But, yes, we are having fun. A world of difference between these bikes and the ones we rented at the Yuck.?
Quote from: jimr
Lynn, you got the pronunciation correct, but the spelling is YOUGH.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on May 01, 2011, 07:19:16 pm
Finally broke out the bike today. Went for a short ride to start the base miles process  :P.

Skied yesterday and had to dodge too many bare spots. Put away the skis  :'(. Managed to get 46 days skiing in. Overall a good season. Now to focus on saddle time and miles.

The 'loaf was totally covered a week ago. Had some rain and one day hit 85? last week. Really slapped the mountain.

Time to focus on summer. Boat out of storage on the 13th, docks go in on the 21st. Picked up a Hobie Cat the end of last season and in need of a maiden run.

Here's to a great summer  8)!!! 8)!!
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on May 01, 2011, 10:55:54 pm
Jim:

What model of Hobie cat?  I had a Hobie 16 for a number of years.
What a fast and fun way to sail, especially when on a trapeze.

ENJOY.
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on May 02, 2011, 07:08:31 pm
Got a Hobie Wave since I will be sailing alone most of the time (that is also what was available). Have sailed a Hobie 14 a lot in the past. Some experience on the 16's. The Wave has the reputation of being a good one man boat that can go out in big wind. I like big wind  :-*. Used to drive my wife crazy when I used to windsurf in 20 - 30 mph wind and nobody else on the lake  ;D. So the wave is my concession to the aging process  8).

Jim
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on May 02, 2011, 07:27:20 pm
I think I rented a Wave a few years back. Mainsail only, no boom? Nice boat.

The Hobie 16 was a lot by myself. Too much sail for anything more than 12-15 mph winds, but it did fly. My reason for getting rid of it - it just got to be too much getting the mast up by myself (any bets on whether Gary jumps on that line). 14's & 16's were also prone to pitchpole, I think the Wave has a lot more bow?
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on May 02, 2011, 08:11:24 pm
Wave is a mainsail only design. Work around jib possible. I think most who add the jib are using it to get more sail area when carrying more weight ie passengers.

My understanding is the hull design has less rocker and more width that tends not to submarine when flying the windward hull. Less submarining = less pitchpole.

Supposed to be easy (by single sailor) to right if you manage to tip her over. Has a mast float to make it difficult to turtle.

All of these aspects need confirmation by sailing her, hopefully soon.

BTW, nice hijack of the the original topic  ;).
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: jim-ratliff on May 02, 2011, 08:24:11 pm
And three holes in the clew of the sail to hook the mainsheet for controlling sail shape.  And there was something about the mainsheet traveler that I thought was really nice, but don't remember any more.


OK, I bought a cell phone/GPS carrier for the bike handlebar that works really well.  Its enclosed and padded, so the phone/GPS is protected, and the plastic cover conducts touches through to the phone.  I have an Android (EVO HTC) and the maps function from Google is better than my GPS, especially since most of the local bike trails are on the map and the satellite overlay is sometimes very informative.  Aerodynamically a brick, but sometimes that's OK.   


Lynn and I are planning a trip to the Amish area near Lancaster PA later in the summer and trying to minimize the likelihood of getting dramatically lost in the woods and mud again.  ;D
Title: Re: cycling season has arrived
Post by: meput on May 02, 2011, 08:43:26 pm
Don't take a header with your cellphone/GPS on the handlebar and destroy it. May be your only way to contact civilization.  :o

Use my Garmin 305 on my bike for speed, time of ride, distance and heart rate. The iPhone lives in a pocket (playing tunes). I try not to get lost that I need to access maps on the smartphone  :-\.

Nice save on the topic  ;D.